Posts tagged with: Android L
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    Yesterday we checked in on the latest Android L rumors, with a claim suggesting that when the software leaves development and goes public this fall, it might do so as Android Lion. But that's not the only candidate that's been put forward so far, and today we check out some possible evidence in favor of another L-name, while also revealing some ongoing changes to the Android L Material Design interface. In a recent Chrome bug report (since taken down), we get to see a Nexus 5 running an Android L dev build. The code suggests a very recent build, coming from earlier this month, and we see ...

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    What will be the final designation Google gives to its next major Android release? Following Jelly Bean and KitKat, it's time for an L-named treat, but just which? Back at Google I/O, Google managed to side-step the issue with this “Android L” business, but that's just a placeholder. With the big public release of Android L due for this fall, along with expectations for new Nexus hardware, when are we going to lean this software's final name? We've got a couple news developments along those lines to check out as we start the week. First up, there's what happened over the weekend – or ...

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    Earlier this month I wrote about why I'd use the heck out of multi-user support on my Android phone. That spawned quite a debate among Pocketnow readers as well as those in my social circles. Before we dive too deeply into that, let's look at the history of multi-user support on Android. Back in the early days of Android 4.2 A New Flavor of Jelly Bean, we got our first taste of multi-user support - but it was limited to only tablets. Phones didn't get the same multi-user capabilities. As it turns out, it's built into the operating system and many custom ROMs took advantage of that fact and ...

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    Google set its sights on developing markets this year, announcing Android One during its Google I/O keynote this past June. Android One would provide resources for manufacturers to quickly and easily put together handsets running stock Android, while simultaneously giving users access to speedy software updates. With phones priced at $100 or less, the program promised to really step-up the quality we find at the bottom of the budget hardware barrel. Last we heard, the first Android One models might debut in India sometime in late October. Now new rumors suggest that Android One could ...

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    One of the things that was weird about Google's announcement of Android L was that we didn't get a tasty codename. All versions of Android thus far have had a dessert attached to their names, with the latest one being KitKat, so we were surprised to hear that the next version would simply be called "L," though many theorized that this was simply for the developer preview and that the final version would bear a tasty name as usual. Now support for that theory is flooding in, as multiple references to "LMP" in AOSP, the Android L SDK, and a WiFi certification document lead us to believe the ...

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    Rumors have been flying that Motorola has been chosen to make the next Nexus iteration, and most (if not all) called the phone the Nexus 6 – it's the sixth Nexus phone to be made, and it's also rumored to have a 5.9-inch screen size. Today we're seeing a report that looks to partially shoot down these earlier rumors, as the Motorola Nexus X name leaks for the first time. According to unacknowledged sources of PhoneArena, the phone will be named Motorola Nexus X (as we said earlier), and it will allegedly have the Motorola model number XT1100. This leads us to think the earlier report ...

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    "You know what I hate? Handing my tablet over to one of my kids to keep them entertained 'for a few minutes' only to discover that their 'entertainment' was changing my wallpaper, rearranging my icons, and messing up my tablet!" That's what I said back in 2012 when we started learning about Android 4.2 A New Flavor of Jelly Bean. Since then, two out of the three tablets in my house has multiple logins. My wife shares her original Nexus 7 with our seven year old son, and I have a "guest" account set up on my 2013 Nexus 7. The practicality of multi-user support on a tablet is almost without ...

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    Six weeks ago today, a day after Google detailed the arrival of Android L at its Google I/O keynote, the company released the first Android L Developer Preview images. Downloads were available for both the 2013 Nexus 7 and the Nexus 5, and we quickly took advantage of these resources to bring you a hands-on look at the updated platform. In the time that's followed, Google's been hard at work on finalizing Android L with its eye on a public release this fall, and today we check out the next step on the path towards that goal, as a couple new Android L Dev Preview releases arrive for those ...

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    When it arrived in the fall of 2012, Android 4.2 Jelly Bean delivered a feature users had long asked for: support for multiple user profiles on a single device. Problem was, that mode was only accessible on tablets. Rumors speculated a lot about why that was, initially placing the blame on existing software patents that covered such a mode for phones, but then last summer we finally got an official response, describing it largely as a user interface and technical problem: when you've got multiple users, to whom should things like text messages and incoming voice calls be directed? Now with ...

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    While users may not have always responded favorably, the ability of OEMs to deliver wildly divergent looks for their Android UIs could be seen as big success story for the sort of openness and flexibility that only Android offers. In the very early days of Android, everything looked the same. Manufacturers kept the stock OS intact and focused on deploying hardware -- that's where the real creativity was exercised back then. That approach didn't last long. Shortly after HTC built the G1 for T-Mobile, it created other phones with interfaces that began to refine the somewhat basic look and ...

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    Last week we checked out a leak that detailed many of the changes coming in an upcoming Google Play Store redesign, embracing the aesthetics of Material Design with a look that was clean, with bold color, good use of white space, and big eye-catching graphics. Back then we had no real sense of how soon these changes might hit the public, or if we'd even be waiting until the Android L this fall before seeing them land. As it happens we're finding out already, as word arrives that Google is already pushing out updates that begin to deliver the Play Store's new look. The changes aren't ...

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    Google hasn't necessarily taken the world by storm with its Android Wear offerings. Some people claim to still be waiting for the Moto 360, and others have found that being an early adopter is not such a good idea. If you read Michael Fisher's reviews on the LG G Watch and the Samsung Gear Live, you'll learn that even though these two products are cool, their biggest shortcomings are found within their software. Basic issues like not allowing developers to create custom watch faces is one of them, and Google has decided to end the complaints with a statement. Wayne Piekarski, a senior ...

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    Google I/O brought us a new look for Android: Material Design. The new direction Google described for its platform took the current trend towards simple layouts punctuated with bold color to its logical conclusion, delivering a look that isn't just clean and highly approachable, but also makes it easier for devs to scale content between device sizes and form factors. At I/O, Google shared some of the ways Material Design would be changing the look of Android, and now a leak offers us a more in-depth glimpse into one in particular, previewing the changes coming to the Play Store. Right ...

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    As much as we've praised Google for Android L's design and fluidity, there are certain parts of the developer build that aren't perfect, and we're not talking about bugs. Android L continues to be "open source," but Google is adding tighter controls to the visual appeal of the user interface. One of these aspects is the fact that you still can't customize the buttons of the "quick settings" menu, though hopefully that might change before the final launch. A user recently posted a request on Android's issue tracker for Google to consider your ability to modify the buttons that appear on ...

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    The trajectory of Motorola's work on wearables is pretty transparent for the immediate future: the Moto 360 is very much happening, and right now it's just a matter of waiting for sales to begin. But while the company has been quite forthcoming with its smartwatch plans, that hasn't been the case with its phones. Instead, we've been poring through leaks and rumors trying to work out what's going on with this X+1 Moto X successor. While there's been no shortage of raw info, it's been tricky to work out just what's really the X+1, and what might be other upcoming Motorola Androids. We've got ...

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