Posts tagged with: Android Guy Weekly
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    Last week on the Android Guy Weekly we talked about how batteries are holding our devices back. Our CPUs, GPUs, RAM, screens, and wireless radios are getting more power-hungry, but our batteries aren't making the same technological leaps as the other components. The comments on that episode we very informative and helpful, but a single thread began to stand out from the others: What can I do to make my battery last longer. What was more interesting that the comments were geared more to the lifespan of the battery, not the run-time per charge. We'll tackle that in today's episode of The ...

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    Batteries are included inside all our smartphones and tablets, but most of us don't pay much attention to them -- not until we run out of juice. Every phone includes the capacity of its battery somewhere on its spec sheet. A Nexus One includes a 1400mAh battery and a GSM Galaxy Nexus includes a 1750mAh battery. Both run at 3.7 volts. In batteries, "pressure" is measured in voltage, the size of the jug is measured in amp-hours (or milliamp hours). If we compare electricity to water, milliamp hours (mAh), are analogous to the size of a water jug; volts (electromotive force) are analogous to ...

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    With the NFC-enabled Google Wallet app arriving on more devices, more phones coming with NFC, and batteries not getting any bigger, is is safe to upgrade your battery? Given the fact that batteries in these phones have a message on them that indicate they include NFC inside the battery itself, can you you simply swap your battery? Will doing so make Google Wallet stop working? How does all this magical NFC stuff work, anyway? We'll answer that, and more, in today's episode of the Android Guy Weekly! What is NFC? NFC, or Near Field Communication, is essentially just another transceiver ...

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    In this week's episode of the Android Guy Weekly we'll talk about technology, politics, and animal husbandry. No, really! Somehow me manage to tie it all together into a common thread, but you'll just have to watch the video to see what I mean. Operating systems and brand-names aside, when someone goes to buy a new smartphone or tablet, or install a new app, they fall into one of two groups: those who buy the product because it's what they've been told to get, and those who are more fully-informed about what they're getting and why. To tell them apart we'll call the first group "sheep" and ...

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    This week's Android Guy Weekly was delayed due to a medical emergency in the family, but the experience taught me some things about how to better prepare for emergencies and utilize our smartphones to potentially save a life. Our first tip involves using the "Owner Information" on your phone to help provide first responders information about who to contact and if you have any allergies in case you're involved in an accident or can't answer for yourself -- and addresses the problem of securing your phone with a lockscreen but still allow paramedics to see your ICE contact. Our second tip ...

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    A few viewers have written in with various questions about dual-core versus quad-core, Cortex A9 versus A15, nvidia's Tegra 3, and why relative performance between them is so different and seems to defy logic. In this episode we'll talk a little about cores, different architectures, and make some super-awesome car-analogies along the way to try to explain it all. We'll keep things high-level enough to keep the episode understandable, but will get into enough detail to keep things interesting -- and you'll find out why a 3-cylinder commuter car is sometimes more desirable than a high-end ...

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    Ads help app developers release "free" apps, but they're still able to make money through ad networks. Ads help content providers "pay the bills" so they can write content that you and I like to read, watch, or listen to. Love them or hate them, ads are what let you get your apps and content for "free". Recently, T-Mobile USA updated one of their apps and "accidentally" included the ability to push ads into user's notification bar -- a space that's supposed to be reserved for "important" information. T-Mobile later apologized, but it's got us asking, where are ads acceptable, where are ...

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    Today's topic goes way back to the PC days where OEMs would load them up with software that you didn't need, and most users didn't want. The term for this software? "Bloatware". Pocketnow reader Laurentiu sent in the following question: What do you think about built in Apps in Android devices, starting with launchers (Touchwiz, Sense, etc), daily apps like memo takers, voice recorders, email clients, Kies air and the corresponding widgets for these applications. Many refer to them as bloatware, while I find them useful and better integrated with the OS than third party apps. Cheers, ...

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    To root, or not to root, that is the question. In the past if you've wanted to do "really technical stuff" like use your camera's flash as a flashlight, synchronize your clock with a time server, or even backup your phone. You wouldn't think that you'd need superuser permissions to be able to do any of those, but you have. Later builds of the Android OS have exposed APIs, hooks that programmers can use, to accomplish the same sorts of things -- without requiring superuser, or ROOT. A lot of things still require ROOT to work correctly. The entire CyanogenMod custom ROM requires ROOT, and ...

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    In the United States phones and cellular plans are almost synonymous. You can't get one without the other, and you're generally limited to the make and model of phone depending upon your selected carrier. US carriers also offer discounted phones -- as long as you sign up for a multi-year contract with them. The phones are subsidized by the carriers in exchange for your contact with them. Is this hurting OS upgrades on those subsidized phones? That's the question we'll ask in today's episode of The Android Guy Weekly!

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    We're seeing more powerful handheld devices come out, and less powerful laptops and "ultra-books" at some point we're going to have very similar specifications between the two. Ironically, that time is now! We've seen Motorola trying to enable a desktop-like experience with their devices via "web top", and most smartphones and tablets come with some form of video-out to display on a larger screen. What's it going to take to get real desktop experiences from a mobile device? That's our topic for this week's Android Guy Weekly!

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    It's been three months since Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich made its debut, so why aren't we seeing it on more devices? Is something wrong with it? There just might be, and we look at some reasons why in this week's episode of the Android Guy Weekly. Google's Samsung Galaxy Nexus was the launch device that ushered in Ice Cream Sandwich. Shortly thereafter it was released to the AOSP for other developers to begin working with. That was last November, it's a few days shy of March. How do you like the accessories for your Galaxy Nexus? What? You don't have them yet? That's because they ...

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    As smartphones are getting faster, we're able to do more with them. In fact, many of us are phasing out the use of traditional computers for their miniature cousins in our pockets. Smartphones and tablets aren't wired down to a network jack, they're connected over the air. Since it's fairly likely that you'll send sensitive information at one point or another (passwords, back account numbers, etc.), it's probably a good time to ask ourselves which network technology is more secure: cellular or WiFi? Network Technologies WiFi is built primarily one one set of protocols. Virtually every ...

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    These days we have smartphones and tablets with single cores, dual-cores, and we're talking about quad-cores. What is a "core"? What does it do? Why do we need so many? And how many cores is "enough"? That's what we'll find out in this week's Android Guy Weekly! 0:30 - Terminology 1:25 - How can things be made "faster"? 1:49 - Subway analogy 4:20 - Parent and Children tasks 5:35 - Applying the analogy to phones and tabs 6:00 - Battery constraints 7:11 - Dual-core versus dual-cpu 8:50 - Smartphones versus small tablets 9:35 - 10" tablets 12:00 - My thoughts: How much is enough? 14:10 - Your ...

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    Many of us grew up with relatively small, low-resolution televisions as the primary -- perhaps the only -- screen in the home. We didn't think about it at the time, but these displays had a resolution of roughly 480i. That's the number of horizontal lines that are drawn across the screen. The "i" means "interlaced": only half of those lines are changed at a time. Back in the day, that was the best we had. As screens started getting bigger, the lines became more obvious -- and the picture got worse. The industry has standardized on two primary television resolutions: 720 and 1080. While the ...

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