Posts tagged with: Samsung

Samsung is a Korea based company that was founded in 1938, and is one of the most popular and successful electronics companies in the world. Like its most businesses, Samsung's mobile division creates products that are widely sold all over the world. Today Samsung smartphones are powered by Google's Android OS and Samsung's own BADA OS. Some popular Samsung devices include Nexus S, Galaxy S series, and more. Read our Samsung coverage for the latest news, reviews and videos about Samsung smartphones:

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    Popular Weibo tech analyst Bing Yuzhou isn't afraid to toss around silicon and yap about it like the rest of their kind. AnTuTu here, HiSilicon over there, CPU, GPU, multi-thread, multi-core... just a whole bunch of numbers get put out there. But since we're in Galaxy S8 territory and looking towards what a rumored Exynos 8895 might have, we find ourselves without any evidence at this point, so take this news lightly. Bing posted that the 8895 has a top speed potential of 3.0GHz and can score a 2,301 in an unnamed single-thread test (maybe Geekbench) and 7,019 in a multi-thread test. The ...

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    We've been triangulating Samsung's next move after it had to suffer through the Galaxy Note 7 recall. A burst of Galaxy S8 chatter was quick to surround the chaebol's Note 7 introduction and then its recall announcement, faster than previous years. Perhaps, the tech press surmised, the next Galaxy S would chase away this burning, bitter pill. Well, financial analysts are agreeing as their intel suggests that Samsung cannot afford to wait through the first quarter of next year to launch the S8. For one, Mirae Asset Securities suggests that Samsung would do better forwarding S8 sales than ...

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    As Samsung continues pressing further recalls for its defective and exploding Galaxy Note 7 devices around the world, it's also finalizing new units that will be shipped to replace each and every one of them. Plans in Australia have new units out by next week while the US is getting an "expedited" treatment. How sped up? Maybe a hint could be found in responses from Samsung Canada as it is working to replace about 22,000 units in the country. Customers were asked — and encouraged by Health Canada — to register for a Note 7 exchange program. Once that was done, users received an email ...

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    If you were expecting some long overdue positive development on the exploding Samsung phone news front, we guess you’ll just have to wait until next week, when replacements for faulty Galaxy Note 7 units should gradually start shipping around the world. Meanwhile, more Galaxy devices, including older ones, are seen suspiciously blowing up on camera, software patches near their rollout for battery charge-limiting purposes, and the global Note 7 recall that reached Canada the other day now spreads to China. But fret not, as only 1,858 copies of the hazardous S Pen phablet sold in the ...

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    With the Galaxy Note 7 currently not safe to use, and dependable new inventory for folks who didn’t prematurely buy an explosive original variant still needing several weeks to become available, there’s little reason to pick up the “New” Samsung Gear VR headset, aka “Latest Edition.” As long as you plan to hold on to your micro USB-supporting Galaxy Note 5, S6 Edge+, S6, S6 Edge, S7 or S7 Edge, you might as well save a few bucks and get the first Gear VR Consumer Edition, model number SM-R322. Granted, its field of view is limited to 96 degrees, compared to 101 for the ...

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    We’re going to be brutally honest with you off the bat here. Sometimes, electronic devices will break sans an apparent cause. And in very rare cases, they’ll do so by overheating, catching fire and, ultimately, blowing up, threatening the user’s well-being. Phones, tablets, laptops, desktops, you name it, it happens, regardless of the make and model. Of course, when it happens on a relatively large scale, it’s the manufacturer’s fault for cutting quality control corners, recklessly speeding up production, and not discovering a damning component defect. But if all of a sudden ...

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    The Brooklyn, New York, boy that had one of his hands burned by an exploding battery within a Samsung smartphone is still shook up, but is doing okay overall this week. But the Samsung smartphone that was reported to be a recalled Galaxy Note 7 by the New York Post — a rag with a very spotty record — was not as such. WNBC-TV reported yesterday that the phone was actually a Galaxy Core phone, specifically the Galaxy Core Prime, a phone not under recall by Samsung. The explosion, which happened as six-year-old Kadim Lewis was playing games on the phone, is currently considered an ...

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    Desperate times call for desperate measures, and while Samsung insists no potentially hazardous Galaxy Note 7 units will be remotely deactivated, some kind of a backup plan needs to be worked out to keep stubborn users from hurting themselves and those around them. As BNP Paribas analyst Peter Yu recently told the Associated Press, Samsung “has to contain the battery explosions but people are not returning the phones.” Why? Misinformation, recklessness, or just good old fashioned laziness, you name it, and it probably applies in a vexing number of cases for thousands of ticking time ...

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    It’s the same slightly larger, beefier 10.1-inch 2016 derivation of the 9.7-inch mid-range Galaxy Tab A released back in the spring of 2015, now including a dedicated slot for a productivity and creativity-enhancing S Pen accessory. That’s the “new” Samsung Galaxy Tab A (2016) with S Pen in a nutshell, and it costs the rough equivalent of $445 (489,000 won) over in Korea. It doesn’t run full Windows 10, and settles for a conventional slate form factor rather than a hip 2-in-1 convertible setup, also sticking to a PLS LCD screen instead of making the jump to an arguably sharper ...

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    Remember how quickly the Galaxy Note 7 explosion frenzy escalated, from one or two reported cases to 35 worldwide, at which point Samsung pulled the plug on sales and started recalling potentially hazardous devices? It turns out those were the good times, as you may have suspected by following the news lately, and unfortunately seeing no substantial drop in coverage of high-profile fire incidents causing harm to children, destroying expensive automobiles, and burning down residential garages. Unsurprisingly therefore, the grand total of Galaxy Note 7 battery overheating instances reported ...

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    Checking back in on one of the more unique phones in Samsung’s lineup, Jaime tackled the main review for this beauty, but we couldn’t let him have all the fun. For 2016 this manufacturer focused on refining the Galaxy, improving on what worked, fixing what didn’t. Though the Galaxy S6 Active was a formidable entry last year. The S7 Active also represents a focus on refinement. Increasing the battery capacity, replacing the micro SD card expansion, and providing the first fingerprint sensor on a rugged phone, the S7 boasts some welcome improvements over its predecessor, though the ...

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    Samsung is in the midst of a total recall thanks to exploding batteries in its Galaxy Note 7 smartphones and the risks of harm to its customers. And while the company could effectively flip a kill switch to stop further damage. it instead issued a refutation today. Word got out around Reddit over the weekend that French retailers were supposedly notified that old Galaxy Note 7 units were to be remotely deactivated on September 30. Such an action would ensure that defective units would not be mistaken for new ones. The company denied the rumor, though, in a statement to Android Central, ...

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    A cohesive product branding and release strategy would probably help Samsung sell even more mid-range Android phones than it currently does, but unfortunately, the Galaxy A, C, J and O(n) families are still all over the place. Granted, the Korean tech giant has more important things to worry about. Then again, how complicated and time-consuming can it be to check a calendar, and settle on a name for looming Galaxy A-series upgrades? 2017 generations of the A3, A5 and A7 are apparently a few months away, tops, with a Galaxy A8 (2016) however also most likely scheduled for a commercial ...

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    If it can happen to one of the world’s most successful and, until recently, trusted smartphone manufacturers, it can definitely happen to any other OEM as well. In fact, it did happen several times before the global scandal of chain Galaxy Note 7 explosions blew up (pun intended), to companies as diverse as LG, Apple and Xiaomi. Fortunately for them, the incidents were isolated and seemingly unconnected, occasionally having the owners of hazardous devices to blame for mishandling fickle components like batteries and accessories including cables and chargers. Still, Xiaomi should start ...

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    It’s still 2016, but as per usual, and despite unforeseen trouble with Galaxy Note 7 production, Samsung is already cooking up the next generation of both flagship and non-flagship Android smartphones. Now, the Korean tech giant isn’t exactly famous for ultra-low-cost handhelds, or above-average diminutive models, but if priced correctly, the upcoming Galaxy A3 (2017) could well give Sony’s Xperia X Compact a proverbial run for the money. Believed to integrate fingerprint recognition, just like the 2017 editions of the larger, higher-end A7 and A5, the 4.7-incher is also practically ...

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    A picture might be worth a thousand words, but in the seemingly never-ending saga of globally-recalled Galaxy Note 7 units with faulty batteries under the hood, a written account of the umpteenth unfortunate event involving a phone explosion should well be worth a million words of caution. In case you still weren’t convinced of the gratuitous risks incurred by holding on to a ticking time bomb with a pretty screen, fancy iris scanner and powerful processor, hearing about a little boy in Brooklyn, New York recently sustaining burns must once and for all stress the seriousness of the ...

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    Samsung's Exynos chipsets currently use GPUs based on ARM's reference design, the Mali-T series. But that blueprint could change as early as next year, if talks with NVIDIA or AMD work out for a intellectual property licensing deal. That's the word according to SamMobile at this stage, with NVIDIA rumored to be a likelier choice at this point with its Pascal heterogeneous system architecture. AMD, however, has its Polaris HSA that will be working on the PlayStation 4 Pro (announced the same day as the iPhone 7) when it gets released in November. An Exynos product with HSA could come ...

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    A French Redditor who claims to work in the mobile retail space has laid out what could be Samsung's plans for replacing every Galaxy Note 7 unit affected by its global recall, at least in that European nation. Customers will be notified that they will be receiving what amounts to a reconciliation package starting September 19. It will contain a new-in-box Note 7 in the original color that was ordered, a Gear VR, — which was already due to those who placed pre-orders — and a prepaid parcel to send the broken unit to Samsung. Redditor LimboJr also was told that "every recalled phone ...

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    In the US, the Consumer Product Safety Commission puts its voice out into the noise of regulatory sirens on Friday with an official press statement "urging all consumers who own a Samsung Galaxy Note7 to power them down and stop charging or using the device." Samsung itself issued a global voluntary recall the week prior as it had found a flaw in some of the embedded batteries. Airlines in Australia, the Philippines and the UAE have banned the charging and use of the Note 7 in-flight. The FAA has advised against such activities, but has not banned them. The CPSC and Samsung are ...

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    The Galaxy Note 7 came alone. And its screen was diametrically tapered. You could say Samsung gave it a characteristic "edge" that it had given to some major mobile flagships in the past couple of years. But soon, it could be the only way that the chaebol will do its smartphone screens. The Korea Herald reports from its sources that the Galaxy S8 will come in two sizes with the screens at 5.1 inches and 5.5 inches in diameter. Both will feature "edge" screens, barring any yield concerns in manufacturing the glass. This will also depend on curvature gradient — another rumor is that the ...

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    It's the story that keeps on smoking. One day after the Federal Aviation Administration advised commercial airline passengers to essentially keep their recalled Galaxy Note 7 turned off in the skies, Samsung released a press statement acknowledging the FAA's release. "We are aware of the Federal Aviation Administration statement about the Galaxy Note7," the statement reads in part. "We plan to expedite new shipments of Galaxy Note7 starting from this week in order to alleviate any safety concerns and reduce any inconvenience for our customers." It was a week ago that the company recalled ...

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    It’s not the size number of megapixels, it’s how you use them. That might be a tried and true saying (just think of the stellar single 12MP cam on the back of both the Galaxy Note 7 and S7), but it obviously doesn’t hurt to beef up the megapixel count where possible. Enter the mid-range (yeah, right) Samsung Galaxy A7 2017, which technically eclipses the company’s recent flagships in terms of the main and secondary snapper. What “secondary” snapper? Well, this upcoming 5.5-incher appears to fit the same exact droolworthy 16MP photography virtuoso on both its rear and face, ...

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    While Samsung certainly deserves to get flak for endangering people’s lives by not properly testing the Galaxy Note 7 and its now definitively faulty battery prior to the phablet’s commercial launch, you can’t turn a blind eye to the response time, rapid acknowledgment and stellar overall damage control from the past week. Sweeping this issue under the rug was never an option, and as “heartbreaking” as short-term financial losses might feel, there’s something far more important at stake. The logical next step in the OEM’s rampant reputation-saving campaign after a voluntary ...

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    We get it, major software updates take time in the chaotic, loosely Google-governed, open-source mobile world. Especially when both third-party OEMs and notoriously laggy US carriers are involved in the “optimization” process. And yes, it makes perfect sense for the Galaxy S6, S6 Edge, Note 5 and S6 Edge+ to be prioritized over the older, less popular Note 4 and outright weird and experimental Note Edge. But with Sprint capable of getting the Marshmallow ball rolling here way back in March, and Verizon and T-Mobile following suit in June, we can’t find AT&T any acceptable excuse ...

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    You can still board commercial aircraft with your recalled Galaxy Note 7 turned on and even use it in the air, but you'll probably be worrying your neighbors, flight crew and regulators all the way up to 30,000 feet and then back down again. After recent consideration, the Federal Aviation Administration has issued a statement advising passengers "not to turn on or charge these devices on board aircraft and not to stow them in any checked baggage" in the wake of recent Note 7 explosions that Samsung has traced to defective batteries. The company recalled all sold units and will be ...

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