Posts tagged with: LTE

LTE, short for Long Term Evolution, is the fourth wireless standard that provides theoretical download speeds of over 1gbps. Verizon was first to the market with LTE, followed by AT&T, Sprint, and lastly, T-Mobile. Carriers are providing smartphone, tablets, and other connected devices that take advantage of these faster data speeds.

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    The Kyocera Torque's 4-inch WVGA display and 4GB of on-board storage won't necessarily impress you, nor will its 5MP camera or its older build of Android ICS. But it's the first phone to launch in America with Kyocera's crazy-futuristic tissue conduction earpiece technology, which blew our minds a little bit in our hands-on at MWC. But its IP67 and MIL-STD 810G durability ratings should be enough to get you to sit up and take notice, especially if you end up drop-kicking the Torque into a freezing pond whose bottom is lined with razor blades (like ya do, from time to time). We don't go ...

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    Watch today's Pocketnow Daily as we talk about all the controversy regarding the leaked Galaxy S 4 Photos, which turned out to be fake. Then we move over to LG since their new Optimus G Pro Quick Covers do a better job than the flip covers on the Galaxy S III. Verizon is next as we talk about their plans to phase-out CDMA and go fully LTE aside from dropping fees in the process. Then we talk about Apple and the possible release dates for the iPad 5, iPad mini 2 and iPhone 5S. We end today's show talking about Nokia's new plan to convince Instagram to join Windows Phone. All this and more ...

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    The rise of LTE has brought alongside it a dream we've yet to see realized: that some day pure-LTE phones will be the norm, and we might finally get smartphones with radio support so broad that they could function on any carrier in the US. As things stand, we still have a long way to go, and all the currently-available LTE phones also have 3G and legacy voice support that can be carrier-dependent. Still, we've seen progress towards this goal, like the recent news of AT&T, Verizon, and T-Mobile trying a spectrum-sharing experiment. The latest development that has us hopeful comes from ...

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    LG made an official announcement according to which the company has now managed to sell over ten million smartphones with LTE capabilities worldwide. The LG Optimus G was definitely a key factor and the company “will continue to expand our footprint in the global LTE market with a wider range of differentiated, high quality LTE smartphones", said Dr. Jong-seok Park, President and CEO of the LG Mobile Communications Company. With a forecasted increase of LTE phones LG is setting its targets for 2013, as the South Korean phone maker wants to "double its LTE smartphone penetration this ...

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    Ever since it was discovered that the Nexus 4 included hidden support for LTE operation, like its Optimus G cousin, it was clear that Google had to do something. After all, phones just using their radios any way they please is a big no-no, and the Nexus 4, unlike the Optimus G, wasn't specifically FCC certified for LTE use. Either LG and Google would have to get the phone re-certified, adding that LTE support officially, or the phone would need to have this hidden feature removed. Well, the other day we started witnessing Android 4.2.2 come to a number of Nexus devices, but not then the ...

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    CES 2013 was many things: a beacon of hope offering tons of potential for the new year in tech; a smorgasbord of cool devices and odd offerings to drool over; and, to hardware-hungry mobile mavens like me, something of a disappointment overall. Still, there was enough newsworthy content for the Pocketnow team to generate over 30 videos packed with mobile-tech reporting. And in the process of shoving all those frames into the YouTubes, we became well-acquainted with the constraints of mobile data networks. Amid the throng of over a hundred thousand people trying to do the exact same thing ...

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    If you've never used a smartphone or tablet connected to an LTE network, you're really missing out. I've tested phones that get 35Mbps download speeds and half-that up at my home and at the office -- and I'm not particularly close to what anyone would call a "metropolitan area". Ironically, speeds like that are faster than my hardwired cable Internet connection that powers my home! Even "slow" LTE connections blow my HSPA+ speeds out of the water! All that speed comes at a cost: diminished battery life. Luckily, LTE doesn't have to be active all the time, just like other wireless data ...

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    We're well used to seeing the same phone released in different markets with changes to its radio's frequency coverage; heck, it's practically par for the course. Sometimes, each individual model has its band support fine-tuned to only work on a subset of all available bands; other times, often with the "global" version of a phone, we'll see them all (or at least most of them) brought together for one handset. The latter is what we're thinking about today, upon learning of the incredible range of frequency coverage provided by the version of Nokia's Lumia 920 for India. If anyone was to try ...

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    Here's a weird one for you: Google has quietly withdrawn a number of Nexus 4 files from its Google Developers archives, including the smartphone's factory image and the phone's associated binaries. While we've yet to see any signs of a formal explanation for the change, rumors are circulating that this is the first step in attempting to block users from accessing the handset's hidden LTE features. Thanks to its Optimus G roots, users discovered that the Nexus 4 is capable of having its dormant LTE radio activated, letting it get online through carriers offering 1700MHz LTE service. That's ...

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    The discovery last month that the Nexus 4 had inherited some of the Optimus G's LTE support was a very intriguing find... if you live in Canada. After all, the single-band LTE that the Nexus 4 could be configured to use only worked on the 1700MHz AWS frequencies, and while those have been allocated for LTE service in the Great White North, they didn't seem much use in the States; maybe T-Mobile would offer AWS LTE in another year or so, but that's not much use for the time being. As it turns out though, AT&T is currently offering LTE over the AWS band in a few markets, letting Nexus 4 ...

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    Like its magenta-hued Lumia 810 cousin, the Lumia 822 is a custom build of Nokia's midrange Lumia 820 for an American carrier. Unlike its blocky T-Mobile USA companion, though, the 822 packs LTE support into its redesigned frame to accomodate the needs of its host, the much-larger Verizon Wireless network. The 822 marks not just Nokia's slice of a Windows Phone resurgence on America's largest carrier, but the first significant Nokia phone of any kind to land on Verizon in quite some time. In the absence of CDMA-friendly versions of either the Lumia 900 or Lumia 920 on Big Red, it also ...

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    Watch today's Pocketnow Daily as we go through the leaked images of the HTC DLX or Deluxe DLX, which is the international GSM variant of the Droid DNA. Then we talk about some Black Friday deals for the iPhone 5 on AT&T, even thought this isn't the conventional iPhone 5 you can buy at any store. Later it's all about Black Friday deals, but mainly when it comes to Software on your respective platform. The Nokia Lumia 920 takes the spotlight also as we talk about its current sales performance at Amazon.com. We end today's show talking about the recent discovery that there may be a simple ...

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    Back when Google was floating the idea of what would eventually become known as "Android", there was a lot of speculation that Google could be making their own phone and offering calling for free -- subsidized by ads rather than your wallet. History, however, has shown that's not what actually happened... but it may have shown us the direction that Google was heading with their operating system that is now on three-quarters of wireless devices. 700 MHz LTE The rumors of Google getting into the telephone business resurfaced when they participated in the bid for the 700 MHz spectrum in 2008 ...

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    As we all know by now, the new Nexus 4 from LG and Google doesn't do LTE. For some of you, that's a deal-breaker, having grown accustom to the kind of breakneck speeds possible over 4G networks. Others will find the lack of support to be a non-issue, happily snatching-up the phones to use over HSPA+. There are probably even a few of you out there wondering if you should hold off a little, in case Google decides to release a new, LTE-supporting Nexus 4 a couple months down the line; frankly, we wouldn't hold our breath. Even though we don't expect to see the Nexus 4 operating on an LTE ...

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    There are a number of good no-contract options for smartphone service in the US, but in some ways those kind of arrangements can come up a bit short from the level of service you get from regular on-contract, post-paid accounts. One big component of that discrepancy is LTE. While three of the four major carriers are well into deploying their LTE networks, if you've wanted an off-contract LTE options you've been severely limited; MetroPCS has LTE, but its speeds are nothing to write home about. The situation may be getting better in the near future, upon rumors that both Boost Mobile and ...

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    Wi-Fi is one of the greatest technological advancements of our time. Networking without wires, and without the need for a large deployment of towers and antennae. It's relatively fast and very easy to set up by average people: just plug in a couple wires, and tap a "connect" button on the router and the device to be paired. Range, however, is limited to around 1,000-feet -- under perfect conditions. The advantages of Wi-Fi might also be considered weaknesses. Public places that offer free Wi-Fi are regularly inundated with far too many people trying to access the network and bandwidth ...

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    In a busy fourth quarter for mobile technology, it's tough to stand out from the pack. Despite our initial skepticism, though, the first "pure Google" smartphone from LG has managed to do just that. Our time spent with the company's Optimus G went a long way toward reversing our negative perceptions about the South Korean OEM. As the leaks flowed in at an increasing rate, we became cautiously optimistic about the device now known as the Nexus 4. But for all the gleaming glass, Snapdragon S4 Pro slickness, and Jelly Bean butteriness of the new Google-experience flagship, there's one ...

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    The Galaxy Note II is finally coming to US carriers, and we just gave you a run-down on the T-Mobile variant of the phone. We mentioned at the time how, unlike the other Note II models, this one only operated over HSPA+, thanks to T-Mobile still being behind the rest the of the pack when it comes to getting on-board with LTE. As it turns out, though, the Note II could be a smart buy for users who are looking forward to the day when T-Mobile finally does start offering LTE service, as the phone already includes the necessary LTE radio. This is apparently a consequence of the T-Mobile Note ...

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    For the past few years, most new-product announcements from South Korea's LG have been greeted in America with a heaping helping of "who cares?" The company has spent so long in the shadow of its more-successful rival Samsung that its smartphones, particularly in the United States, have struggled for even moderate mind share. That struggle is also a product of the widely held conception that LG devices just aren't that good, a conception that devices like the LG Intuition have only reinforced. But recently, LG has caught a glimpse of light at the end of the tunnel. We had the opportunity ...

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    Last week, some rumors had started circulating that MetroPCS might be looking to find itself a buyer, and Sprint, T-Mobile, and even Dish Network might be some of the companies it had been in discussion with. In the comments, many of you seemed hopeful that T-Mobile might be able to improve its position among the big carriers in the States by scooping-up the carrier's assets. We've got good news for you then, as T-Mobile just announced that both companies' boards have approved the deal. Between the two of them, the two carriers have around 42.5 million subscribers. As T-Mobile starts ...

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    MetroPCS is far from the most popular cellular network in the States, but with just shy of ten million subscribers, it's still one of the major players. Even in the shadows of the likes of AT&T and Verizon, it manages to keep itself relevant with some flat-rate service plans and innovations like an early push for VoLTE. Will the carrier be around much longer, though? Its future is looking increasingly uncertain, upon reports that a number of other telecommunications companies are interested in buying it out. Supposedly, T-Mobile, Sprint, and even satellite provider Dish Network are ...

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    One of the awesome things about mobile technology today is that most of us have been around long enough to witness several generations of its evolution. We've seen mobile phones progress from outsized boxes with 4-line monochrome LCDs, to tiny clamshells with blue backlights and internal antennas, back into outsized boxes- now with HD displays and internals that beat out some notebook computers. But the evolution we've followed for years isn't confined to handheld hardware. The networks that fuel the little packages of future-tech we carry in our pockets have undergone their own sweeping ...

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    Motorola's announcement of the RAZR i may be the most high-profile usage of the Intel's new Atom-based Medfield SoCs to date, but it won't see a release in the US. As an LTE-crazy nation, it's getting harder and harder to market new smartphones lacking 4G radios, and we haven't seen any of these phones with Intel chips also support LTE. In a recent interview, Intel’s Director of Product Marketing Sumeet Syal commented on the lack of LTE in these first-gen Medfield designs, and touched on where the company is going from here. The good news is that you shouldn't have long to wait before we ...

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    Sprint seems to be having a hard time with 4G. First they deployed Wi-Max while everyone else was jumping on the LTE band-wagon, now users are complaining that they're not getting LTE on their LTE-enabled Samsung Galaxy Nexus smartphones -- even when they're allegedly under an LTE umbrella. What gives? It turns out there's some magic going on -- well, maybe some well-intentioned technical stuff anyway. The problem, it seems, happens when you've got a stronger 3G signal that your 4G signal. When that's the case the phone figures you'd rather have a reliable signal than a fast one. ...

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    Besides the allure of high-speed data, the deployment of LTE brings with it other reasons to be excited about the future of cellular technology. One of the most promising opportunities LTE presents is letting carriers start moving voice service over to these 4G bands with voice-over-LTE, or VoLTE. Not only will that allow for higher quality voice calls, but eventually we'll get to a point where carriers can switch-off old networks, just like they did with analog cellular, and free-up that spectrum for even more LTE goodness. LTE is all over the place now, so where's VoLTE? The CEO of ...

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