Posts tagged with: Editorial
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    Much like the Pocketnow Weekly, of which Michael Fisher likes to brag that they have “never missed a week” so too can the Weekend Debate claim this similar, although far shorter claim. So it’s Easter Sunday (for some) and here the Weekend Debate carries on! This weekend, the Weekend Debate is taking on a slightly different tone. Normally, I write in and provide both sides of an issue and let you debate in the comments which is the correct side. Not so much this weekend. Because to my eyes, something really bad has happened to a great concept, and I just cannot fathom why. So I’m ...

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    It all started in Palo Alto, California back in 2003 - a little company named Android, Inc. was founded by Andy Rubin, Rich Miner, Nick Sears, and Chris White. The purpose of the venture was to create "smarter mobile devices that are more aware of its owner's location and preferences", and was originally aimed at digital cameras. That market proved not to be large enough, so the focus shifted to smartphones that could compete against Microsoft's and Symbian's offerings. Google acquired Android, Inc. in 2005 and speculation began to swirl that the search engine and email giant was ...

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    When Android-powered smart watches first arrived we had a mostly square product from LG and a mostly round watch from Motorola. Both had pros and cons, but ultimately it was the Moto 360 that earned its spot on my wrist. Now, the second generation of the wearable is rumored to be just around the corner. What do we want to see in the next generation? Here's our wishlist for new new Moto 360. ___________________________________________________________________________ Adam Doud Senior Editor "Reconnect Faster" The Moto 360 seems to have trouble making and keeping a connection to the phone if ...

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    There are a lot of reasons out there to love a smartwatch. They really do make your life easier. They are stylish and functional. They do not replace your smartphone, but they are not supposed to. And yet a lot of people – a LOT – of people out there have not climbed aboard the smartwatch band wagon. Here we are almost a year after the announcement of Android Wear and I can count the number of “in the wild” smartwatches I’ve seen on one hand. I roll with a group of tech savvy individuals both at my job and with my friends and nobody has a smartwatch. So what gives? Too big I know ...

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    Mobile devices are, like most consumer electronic devices, segregated based on one important factor- price range. The smartphone space is for the most part, a price sensitive one. Devices are broadly classified based on their price, into low, mid and high priced tiers. Price segregation also brings with it some differences in terms of specifications. Over the years, there have been scores of smartphones that fall into one of these categories, and the consumer stands to either gain or forego certain features and specifications based on how much money they are willing to spend. As they say, ...

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    With the Surface 3 coming out just 24 hours ago, we thought it was time to look ahead a bit and think about what we'd like to see for the Surface Pro 4. It's probably safe to say that the Surface Pro 4 will debut with Windows 10 which means it's likely still months away. That's ok though, because we can still dream. Here's what some of the Pocketnow editors are dreaming about. Adam Doud Contributing Editor "The main package is right. Now perfect the details." The Surface Pro 3 is a great tablet and is as close to being a laptop replacement as anyone has gotten. The combination of power ...

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    I'm what most would call a "purist" when it comes to Android. The closer to AOSP a device can be, the better. Why? Several reasons, chief among them being consistency of experience and a timely updates - well, more timely than updates seem to come on devices with heavily modified versions of Android. All that having been said, a tablet running HTC Sense UI is a fantastic idea! Honeycomb Tablets running the Android operating system started to pop up around the same time that Apple released its insanely popular iPad. Android wasn't optimized for tablets back then (some would argue that it's ...

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    So, hey Microsoft. You still do know how to keep a relationship fresh and interesting. There we were minding our own business having breakfast together and you drop this bomb. It wasn’t quite like a, “You need to pick up the kids from soccer today and oh by the way I’m pregnant” kind of bomb, but still, it was a doozy. A nice little Surface 3 release is plenty to make a morning interesting. So there I was staring at this new device you dropped in our laps and I didn’t quite know what to make of it. At first, I was like “no 'Pro'…it's not RT is it?” But no, sure enough, ...

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    As we've mentioned before, Google is reportedly coming out with an MVNO service (Mobile Virtual Network Operator) under the label of "Project Nova" sometime in "the coming months". An MVNO is a virtual carrier that uses one or more cellular networks to provide service to its customers. Generally speaking, handsets have been limited to just one carrier due to radios, antenna limitations, and frequency abilities. Where things gets really interesting is with modern handsets that are capable of being used on multiple networks - even when they employ technologies that are fairly different from ...

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    The news has dropped, the review is out, so let’s take a long hard look at this smartphone that HTC is calling its flagship and find out if HTC hit a home run, or a lazy fly to the shortstop. On the one hand, the HTC One M9 does bring some new specifications in the same gorgeous package as its predecessors. Without a doubt, the Snapdragon 810 processor is a step up over the One M8’s Snapdragon 801. Add to that Android Lollipop, an extra gig of RAM and a bigger battery and this is a decent spec bump over its predecessor. Smarter smartphones HTC is also trying to get smarter about its ...

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    It’s interesting to see the turn some phones have taken of late. It seems like the entire industry is focused on making you a healthier and better you. That’s really great in some ways because it points to a societal awareness and desire to live longer and be stronger. But at the same time, there are a lot of things about this that the industry seems to be getting wrong, or at the very least, not right. Fingerprints Biometric data is becoming a more and more important part of our smartphones. If you’re holding a newer iPhone, look no further than the home button. A fingerprint ...

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    When the first Android Wear smartwatch was released, the LG G Watch, I hurried and snatched it up. It was roughly square, which seemed odd for a timepiece, but I'd had rectangular watches before, so I didn't mind. I swapped out the rubber band for a metal one, and began my adventure into wearables. Motorola wasn't far behind - and its wearable was round (well, mostly round) like watches are meant to be. I was hesitant to get the Moto 360 due to some technical differences in the display, the processor Motorola decided to put in the watch, and what has become known around the industry as ...

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    Smartwatches are a blossoming category, especially now that all three major platforms have their own. Apple introduced the Apple Watch, Microsoft introduced the Microsoft Band, and Android introduced a flood of new smartwatches seemingly weekly as Android tends to do. Couple that with the more platform agnostic offerings of Pebble and there’s actually a few decisions to be made here. If you’re on iOS, you can decide between pricey and super-pricey Apple Watch offerings or the aforementioned Pebble. On Android Wear there are no options ranging from $200 up into the thousands, and of ...

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    Windows Phone has a problem. It’s a problem that has been festering for some time now. It’s a problem that needs to be addressed, and relatively soon. At the same time, it’s a problem that probably ~won’t~ be addressed for at least four to six months. That problem is not related to apps, and it’s not related to market share – at least not directly. You’ve probably read the headline, so you know I’m talking about Windows Phone flagships. Great brands are measured by their great products. iOS has famously shunned the lower-income customers by only ever releasing flagship ...

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    By now you've heard the rumors that Qualcomm's Snapdragon 810 SoC is "suffering from overheating issues". You're aware of the claims that the HTC One M9 gets "miserably hot". You've even seen what are purported to be thermal images of various devices, and the One M9 is glowing orange, ready to melt through the tabletop. But is any of it true? Tweakers.net published a very compelling image, one that (on first glance) would convince even the most vocal of naysayers. Unfortunately, it's not realistic.  The staff here at Pocketnow has used an HTC One M9 quite extensively, and on two ...

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    It seems like a fairly simple feature, and one that slipped past most people when Android 5.1 started rolling out: Device Protection. According to Google, if your phone is lost or stolen, when this feature is enabled you'll need to log in with your Google account to unlock it. That's a good thing, but in the past it was fairly easy to circumvent any type of security by factory resetting the device. Data was fairly secure, but the device could then be used (or sold) by the thief (or "finder"). Now, thanks to the Lollipop 5.1 update, on supported devices, factory resetting is protected by an ...

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    Last weekend on the debate, we examined the price of the Apple Watch. The cheapest Apple watch came in at 33% greater than the most expensive competition, the Pebble Time Steel. Whether or not the price is too high isn’t the question this week. What we’re going to examine this week is whether or not the Apple Watch price will help or hinder the platform in general. After that, I promise we won't talk about money. Here’s the part where I say that pricing for all of these devices varies by region, so we’re going to concentrate of US pricing for the sake of consistency. Consider for a ...

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    A couple of weeks ago, I had the opportunity to round out my professional development by carrying iOS as a daily driver. Yes, it was an iPhone 5c. Yes it was basically 2-year old hardware (an iPhone 5 with a hard candy shell). Yes it was a teeny tiny baby phone. All of those were contributing factors to why I switched back to Android. But the most compelling reason by a wide margin was iOS itself. Don’t get me wrong. iOS is a nice operating system. It has its merits just like other operating systems have theirs. But there are a couple of things that are missing or just poorly executed, ...

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    When USB was first released there were basically two types of connectors: the one that you plugged into your computer (which hasn't changed all that much over the years); and the one that you plugged into your printer, scanner, or other peripheral. The latter was somewhat square and looked kind of like a little house, and was fairly easy to plug in. The former was rectangular, and a pain the in neck to plug in correctly the first time around. As the standard evolved, that "house" connector proved to be too big to use in any small devices - especially smartphones. Mini-USB was developed. ...

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    LG makes some fantastic hardware. The Nexus 4 was a tremendous device (despite having a glass back). The G Watch was my first watch powered by Android Wear, and the first wearable worthy of handing my Pebble (Kickstarter Edition) down to my daughter. I even own a pair of Bluetooth headphones with LG's brand slathered all over them, and the Nexus 4 wireless charging "orb" is stilling on my desk as I write this article. Yes, LG truly does make some amazing products. Some of my favorites include flexible handsets and self-healing skins. Who else can even compete with those? Now that we're ...

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    Recently, a rumor came churning out of the mill suggesting that Microsoft might be developing Cortana for iOS and Android. Joe Levi opined earlier this week about what a good idea this was. Microsoft putting its software on as many devices as possible certainly does sound like a great thing on the face of it, but once you dig a little deeper, maybe live is not so rosy underneath the large orange visor. Microsoft and Google have a…strained relationship. Google has stripped its services from Microsoft’s devices while at the same time improving its apps for iOS. Google has even gone so ...

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    Back when Google started hinting at what is now known as "Android Wear", Apple fans came out of the woodwork attacking every little thing. Back then we just had rectangular watches which caused an outcry from Apple Fans. "Watches are meant to be round", they said. "Apple would never stoop to making a 'square' watch", they said. "They" were wrong, and it's wonderful news for Google and Android Wear.Wearables powered by Android Wear are already in their second generation. If you want square, you can get square. If you want round, there's more than one choice. If you want a curved screen, ...

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    Long before smartphones became "smart", business users would carry around a phone, perhaps a pager, and a PDA - a Personal Digital Assistant. This PADD-esque device was typically powered by an OS from Palm (Palm OS), Microsoft (Windows CE), or Apple (Newton). They enabled us to carry our contacts, calendars, task-lists, eBooks, email, and select types of documents with us where ever we went. We'd later sync our PDAs with our desktop computers so the data would remain up-to-date at our desk and on the road. As time progressed pagers and cell phones merged with our PDAs and we now call ...

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    If there's one thing technology power users like us hate, it's carrying a bunch of different charging wires around when we travel. Why can't we standardized on one type of connector that works for everything? For a while around the turn of the century, many smartphones standardized on the mini-USB port for charging and syncing data. HTC even extended the port's specifications to include audio input/output. That was pretty fantastic since you could use one port to charge, sync, and play music on speakers at the same time. In some cases it could even output video. (See: Why the 3.5mm headset ...

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    One thing all of us have in common is the fact that all of our devices will eventually run out of power and need to be charged again. Doing so is a relatively simple process: plug your charging cable into a computer, wall wart, or specialty outlet - then wait. Back in the early days we had relatively small battery capacities and charging our phones didn't take too long. Today we have devices with thousands of mAh capacities that take all night to charge, but typically don't last all day! The solution from Apple and Samsung was to provide some "signaling tricks" which enabled their charges ...

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