Posts tagged with: 802.11ac
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    On the heels of Bluetooth jumping a full point up to version 5, the Wi-Fi Alliance is taking another step forward, though not down the alphabet. The 802.11ac standard is getting a "wave 2" of features. What does the new wave do? It extends simultaneous MIMO support to multiple users within router range. More channels will be available in the 5GHz band while maximum channel bandwidth has been doubled from 802.11ac to 160MHz, letting more data into tubes at once. There's also one extra spatial stream that can be utilized, bringing the total up to four. So, who can catch the new wave, the ...

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    It started out way back in the nineties - Internet without wires. No longer did people have to tie up their phone line while their modem dialed away, beeped, booped, squeaked, squawked, and hissed. Those lucky enough to have an always-on Internet connection could put their laptop anywhere they wanted it - finally free from the limitations and inconveniences of a wired Ethernet cable. Two standards emerged in the beginning: 802.11a in the 5GHz spectrum and 802.11b in the 2.4 GHz spectrum. Both had their pros and cons, but it was 2.4GHz that gained in popularity, partly because of its ...

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    Back in 1999 we got our first real taste of ourĀ wireless future: WiFi. The first variant was called 802.11a and operated in the 5GHz spectrum (later on, 3.7GHz support was added). Back then, 5GHz radios were more expensive than 2.4GHz equipment, and 802.11b quickly surpassed 802.11a in popularity. For years we happily surfed the web, streamed our music, and watched our videos over the 2.4GHz spectrum. But we weren't alone. Another technology started competing for the same wireless spectrum with our WiFi: Bluetooth. It promised to bring "personal area networks" to our mobile devices and ...

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    I've been having some problems with the WiFi side of my router -- the wired side works fine, but WiFi has been giving me problems. This isn't an uncommon occurrence and usually happens as routers age, but happens more frequently as the chips that run the radios get hot. It's that latter part which is kind of interesting. Besides distance issues, I can't recall having had problems with WiFi connectivity in my home. Then over the last year or so I've been suffering from intermittent connectivity problems, dropped sessions, slow transfer rates, and more. The manufacturer of that router ...

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    Way back when Wi-Fi first came out, there were two versions that you could chose from: 802.11a and 802.11b. From a consumer perspective, there wasn't much difference between the two. Devices based on 802.11b were generally less expensive and more readily available than those based on 802.11a, so the b specification quickly became the consumer standard. 802.11b operates in the 2.4GHz spectrum. These days, it's getting pretty crowded, and to help address the digital noise that comes with it, 5GHz WiFi is making a comeback. 802.11a (5GHz) 802.11a was a standard in 1999 which promised to bring ...

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    The router at Pocketnow HQ recently broke-down and had to be replaced. The one that was chosen to replace it featured the latest and greatest in wireless technologies, including 802.11ac WiFi. Since many of today's smartphones and tablets are coming with 802.11ac built-in, what does this "new" technology mean for you, and why should you care about making sure your next device has 802.11ac on its spec sheet? Wireless networking started to gain popularity in 1997 with 802.11a and 802.11b. It was slow. It was expensive. It wasn't very widespread. Eventually we saw a speed boost with 802.11g ...

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