Honor 7A is even cheaper than 7X and 7C with 2:1 screen, dual rear cams and face unlock

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You can never have too many trendy 2:1 smartphones with dual rear-facing cameras and facial recognition. That appears to be Huawei’s credo nowadays, and it covers both own-brand and Honor products.

The latest to tick all three of those essential modern boxes might just be the world’s most affordable “FullView” device, starting at the rough equivalent of $125 (CNY 799) in the largest smartphone market on the globe.

Pretty much identical on the outside to the already inexpensive Honor 7C, the newly unveiled Honor 7A downgrades the Snapdragon 450 processor to a modest octa-core 430 with Adreno 505 GPU, capping off at 3GB RAM and 32GB internal storage space instead of 4 and 64 gigs respectively.

799 yuan only buys you 2 gigs of memory in combination with 32GB local digital hoarding room, while a 3/32 configuration fetches CNY 999, or around $160. Both variants come with 13 + 2MP rear-facing cameras, a single 8MP selfie shooter, Android 8.0 Oreo with EMUI 8.0 on top, and a 3000mAh battery that’s actually quite hefty for a 5.7-incher with razor-thin bezels weighing 150 grams.

Slightly smaller than both the Honor 7X and 7C, the 7A apes the latter’s 1440 x 720 pixel (aka HD+) screen resolution, which results in a marginally higher ppi density. The Honor 7A supports both fingerprint and facial unlocking methods, with the former sensor mounted on the handset’s premium-looking back. No word on international availability yet, and we don’t expect that to change anytime soon.

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About The Author
Adrian Diaconescu
Adrian has had an insatiable passion for writing since he was in school and found himself writing philosophical essays about the meaning of life and the differences between light and dark beer. Later, he realized this was pretty much his only marketable skill, so he first created a personal blog (in Romanian) and then discovered his true calling, which is writing about all things tech (in English).