ShatterShield peeling off edges of Moto Z2 Force, customers being charged for repair


We contacted Motorola when it launched the Moto Z2 Force with its plastic-based ShatterShield screen to see if it would offer replacements for the easily-damaged cover liner to consumers. The company said “no.”

Well, the decision is coming to bite some owners hard as with varying amounts of usage over time, some Moto Z2 Force units have exhibited screen peeling near the edges and the fingerprint sensor of the device. One of the first reports came in November and after the user only got the phone less than a month prior.

While complainants are being advised to phone Motorola customer service to file for a repair job — you know, since the liner is part of a non-removable component — some of them were shocked to find that even under warranty, deductibles can range from $50 to $150. Only a few were able to fight the charge to get a replacement for free. One customer reported getting a whole replacement unit from Verizon free of charge, saying that the carrier was aware of the issue.

In an extreme case, one person decided to attempt a DIY job. The above pictures you see are from Lenovo forums user “sdm_skater,” and entail the process of removing the ShatterShield liner and applying multiple coats of adhesive solvent before placing a third-party screen protector onto the device. It was a void warranty risk this user wanted to take for a better experience with a phone they paid more than $700 for.

Perhaps Motorola should wait until it can work out some of its patented technologies for self-healing glass before trying to market anything as a “ShatterShield” product ever again. Or, better yet, sell replacement liners for $40 like it used to for other phones.

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About The Author
Jules Wang
Jules Wang is News Editor for Pocketnow and one of the hosts of the Pocketnow Weekly Podcast. He came onto the team in 2014 as an intern editing and producing videos and the podcast while he was studying journalism at Emerson College. He graduated the year after and entered into his current position at Pocketnow, full-time.