Samsung will probably lose some 2018 smartphone market share, unlike Apple or Huawei

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Samsung may have played a pivotal role in the global smartphone market rebound of Q3 2017, beating financial record after record lately, and shaking off last year’s Note 7 fiasco like it was no big deal, but the chaebol’s 2018 growth is expected to stall.

Strategy Analytics forecasts the company’s Galaxy handsets will total around 319 million units in shipments this year, enough for a dominant 20.5 percent share of one of the world’s most highly competitive industries right now.

That would be up from roughly 300 million unit sales in 2016, which however secured Samsung a larger 20.8 percent slice of the pie, according to the US research firm, with both numbers projected to drop next year.

Apple’s “premium” new phones and a slew of robust budget options from Chinese outfits could sink the leader’s shipment figures to “only” 315 million units, and its market share to 19.2 percent.

Meanwhile, iPhones are expected to surge from 218 million units and 14 percent share to 234 mil and 14.3 percentage points next year, with Huawei, OPPO and Xiaomi likely to maintain their places among the global top five smartphone vendors.

Of the three, Xiaomi could see its portion of the market jump from 6.1 to 7.4 percent, Huawei is forecasted to remain steady at around 10 percent, gaining a marginal 8 million units in shipments, and finally OPPO is tipped to cling on to a 7.8 percent share in both 2017 and 2018 after scoring a measly 2.8 just a couple of years back.

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About The Author
Adrian Diaconescu
Adrian has had an insatiable passion for writing since he was in school and found himself writing philosophical essays about the meaning of life and the differences between light and dark beer. Later, he realized this was pretty much his only marketable skill, so he first created a personal blog (in Romanian) and then discovered his true calling, which is writing about all things tech (in English).