Wileyfox Pro with Windows 10 Mobile goes up for pre-order in the UK ahead of December 4 release

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As far as Microsoft is concerned, there’s no future for the ill-fated Windows 10 Mobile initiative in terms of both new hardware and major software updates. Naturally, even the few high-profile smartphone manufacturers that stood by Redmond towards the end are looking to throw in the towel, but strangely enough, a couple of lesser-known OEMs don’t want to call it quits just yet.

What’s even more surprising is that Trekstor and Wileyfox haven’t released Windows phones before. And while the former company is unlikely to meet its ambitious fixed goal of €500,000 for the Winphone 5.0’s crowdfunding, the latter 2015-founded British smartphone maker has already put the IFA 2017-unveiled Wileyfox Pro up for pre-order on Amazon.co.uk.

Of course, Wileyfox is used to betting on losing horses, but even so, this modest 5-incher’s £189.99 MSRP feels absurd. Not only does that equate to a ridiculously high $250 or so, but it’s also more than what the UK-based company is currently charging for a far superior Swift 2 Plus with Android 7.1.2 Nougat.

The Wileyfox Pro merely features 2GB RAM and 16GB internal storage, as well as an 8MP rear-facing camera and 2MP selfie shooter. A cringey Snapdragon 210 processor is in charge of raw speed (or lack thereof), while the only upside of the 720p 5-incher’s tiny 2100mAh battery is that the user can easily remove and replace it.

If you feel the Wileyfox Pro is “agile, smart and secure” enough for your “business multi-tasking and efficient working” needs, look for a regional Amazon launch on December 4. No words on “international” availability.

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About The Author
Adrian Diaconescu

Adrian has had an insatiable passion for writing since he was in school and found himself writing philosophical essays about the meaning of life and the differences between light and dark beer. Later, he realized this was pretty much his only marketable skill, so he first created a personal blog (in Romanian) and then discovered his true calling, which is writing about all things tech (in English).