Upcoming iOS 11.2 update will apparently enable faster wireless charging for iPhone X, 8 and 8 Plus

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Apple might be a good few steps ahead of the competition in terms of facial recognition complexity, accuracy and security, but when it comes to charging the company’s fancy new iPhones using modern technology, iFans need to make a lot of compromises and spend quite a bit of extra money.

Although they’re fast-charge capable, which theoretically means they can go from 0 to 50 percent battery capacity in 30 minutes with a powerful enough wired charger, the iPhone X, 8 and 8 Plus require two separate accessories to unlock those skills.

Meanwhile, no one really expected the iPhone X to ship with a wireless charger in the box as standard, but it’s certainly disappointing to see the proprietary AirPower mat held up until next year.

Adding insult to injury, compatible third-party wireless charging “pads” and “bases” are currently limited at 5W speeds. Mophie and Belkin expect that to change with a “free software update coming later this year” to enable “fast” wireless charging, which will reportedly coincide with the iOS 11.2 public delivery soon enough.

iOS 11 has already received a bunch of minor updates largely focused on fixing specific bugs, as well as a semi-major .1 revision including new emoji, KRACK patches and other noticeable UI improvements. iOS 11.2 can’t be too far off, with three betas out for professional devs and casual testers.

But before you get too excited, the iPhone X, 8 and 8 Plus are only set to support 7.5 watts of wireless power after moving to platform build 11.2. That’s still nowhere near as fast as the latest Qi standards technically allow, although it’s pretty close to LG V30’s recently touted 8W achievement. Why isn’t anyone progressing towards the theoretical 15W ceiling again?

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About The Author
Adrian Diaconescu

Adrian has had an insatiable passion for writing since he was in school and found himself writing philosophical essays about the meaning of life and the differences between light and dark beer. Later, he realized this was pretty much his only marketable skill, so he first created a personal blog (in Romanian) and then discovered his true calling, which is writing about all things tech (in English).