Latest Moto Z2 Force render confirms AT&T availability, still no headphone jack

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It ooks like Lenovo may have learned from some of its past Moto mistakes, giving this year’s Z Play edition plenty of time in the spotlight and carefully preparing a very wide-scale US rollout for the ultra-high-end Z2 Force.

Forget Verizon exclusivity, with T-Mobile, “for instance”, confirmed by an unofficial but authoritative source to (eventually) carry the familiar second-gen modular phone, and its clearest, most high-quality render yet (unsubtly) hinting at AT&T support today.

We’re obviously not looking at a GSM unlocked variant with vague AT&T compatibility, but rather a Moto Z2 Force model sporting a relatively discreet logo of America’s second largest wireless service provider on its smooth metal back.

Thus, it’s basically etched in stone that Ma Bell will sell the “shatterproof” Snapdragon 835-powered 5.5-incher directly, just like Big Red, Magenta and possibly even Sprint, which teased the “first of many” Gigabit phones way back in March, revealing Motorola was its producer.

Unfortunately, one fatal 2016 error Lenovo seems bound to repeat is the omission of the universally beloved 3.5mm headphone jack. There are absolutely no excuses this time around, since the Z2 Play manages to squeeze a traditional audio port into a 6mm slim chassis. Now, the Moto Z2 Force sure looks crazy slender, dual camera bulge and all, but it still could accommodate the jack next to its USB Type-C connector, as CAD-based renders suggested back in the day.

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About The Author
Adrian Diaconescu

Adrian has had an insatiable passion for writing since he was in school and found himself writing philosophical essays about the meaning of life and the differences between light and dark beer. Later, he realized this was pretty much his only marketable skill, so he first created a personal blog (in Romanian) and then discovered his true calling, which is writing about all things tech (in English).