This is apparently the Samsung Galaxy C10, the company’s first dual camera phone

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It hasn’t been a secret for quite some time now that Samsung was basically forced to choose between an “Infinity Display” and dual rear-facing camera setup for final Galaxy S8 and S8+ designs due to the reported failure of embedding a fingerprint sensor directly in the two’s screens.

As popular as the iPhone 7 Plus may have proven thanks to its separate wide-angle and telephoto 12MP lenses, Samsung’s call was obviously made easy by the years and years of waiting for so-called “bezelless” mobile devices.

But that doesn’t explain why there’s no other dual cam Galaxy around. After all, the feature has rapidly become a must even for today’s mid-rangers. Asus, ZTE and Gionee are only a few of the companies ready to sell such photographic monsters on a tight budget, and before long, Motorola will join them.

Meanwhile, the impending Samsung Galaxy C10 doesn’t exactly sound or look like a bargain, but it should still be substantially cheaper than the Note 8, not to mention earlier to market. To the Chinese market, at least, following in the footsteps of other extravagant “mid-rangers” like  the C5, C7, C9 Pro, C7 Pro and C5 Pro.

The C10 is surprisingly rumored to be sporting a smaller 5.5-inch screen than both the 5.7-inch C7 Pro and 6-inch C9 Pro. Its bezels are there, not too thick but not too thin, accommodating a “standard” physical home button doubling as a decently placed fingerprint reader.

CAD renders and a nice 360-degree video also reveal some interesting antenna lines (full metal jacket for the win!), a USB Type-C port, side-mounted Bixby button (!!!), and most importantly, those two rear cams Samsung fans must be drooling over, displayed vertically and accompanied by a dual LED flash structure.

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About The Author
Adrian Diaconescu
Adrian has had an insatiable passion for writing since he was in school and found himself writing philosophical essays about the meaning of life and the differences between light and dark beer. Later, he realized this was pretty much his only marketable skill, so he first created a personal blog (in Romanian) and then discovered his true calling, which is writing about all things tech (in English).