HTC Link VR headset works with U11 phone, comes with its own two screens

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If the “squeezable” U11 smartphone follows the U Ultra’s suit with yet another poor box-office showing, we’re sure glad to see HTC getting increasingly serious about virtual reality hardware pretty much by the day.

This is starting to seem like more than a backup plan expected to bear fruit way down the line, with a number of exciting Vive VR headset accessories and “upgrade kits” unveiled of late, and a “good plan” for a powerful mobile counterpart teased just a few months ago.

Interestingly enough, the Taiwanese company might be eyeing a couple of directions in which to take (semi-) standalone immersive products before long, joining Google’s new Daydream-based program recently and now taking the wraps off a gadget dubbed Link with absolutely no warning or buzz.

Unfortunately, that’s because this HTC Link thing is slated for an exclusive Japan launch, with any sort of international expansion ruled out right off the bat. Only compatible with the HTC U11 phone via a physical USB-C connection, the headset refreshingly sports its own two 3.6-inch 1080 x 1200 LCD screens, as well as so-called six degrees-of-freedom tracking for realistic VR movement.

In other words, this is truly a one-of-a-kind device, but perhaps that’s precisely what makes it unprepared for a global rollout. HTC says it’s in no way “linked” to Vive projects, which is quite intriguing, and other above-par specs (at least for mobile VR goggles) include a 110 degree field of view and 90Hz refresh rate. Also, a couple of handheld controllers and even an external camera, though the total price remains under wraps at the moment.

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About The Author
Adrian Diaconescu
Adrian has had an insatiable passion for writing since he was in school and found himself writing philosophical essays about the meaning of life and the differences between light and dark beer. Later, he realized this was pretty much his only marketable skill, so he first created a personal blog (in Romanian) and then discovered his true calling, which is writing about all things tech (in English).