Samsung Galaxy Book with LTE debuts at Verizon April 21, Wi-Fi-only variants launching May 21

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With Galaxy Tab S3 availability out of the way, and Galaxy S8 and S8+ phones just about ready to take over the world, Samsung can finally cater to Windows 10 convertible PC enthusiasts no longer willing to wait for Microsoft’s Surface Pro 5 or Huawei’s extensive second-gen MateBook lineup.

Unfortunately, those of you not too keen on spending a whopping $1,300 for a Verizon-only Samsung Galaxy Book 12-inch LTE model still need to sit tight one more month before Wi-Fi 10.6 and 12-inch versions reach stores nationwide.

In the meantime, you’ll be able to pre-order the two lower-cost Books starting tomorrow, April 21, from Samsung.com and “select retailers including Best Buy.” The smaller 2-in-1 sets you back $630 sans LTE speeds, and the larger variant is $1,129.99, with “general availability” kicking off May 21, and Best Buy getting exclusivity over elegant black flavors, while the rest of the sellers have to make do with slightly less attractive silver models.

Back to Verizon, and the carrier’s expensive LTE-enabled Galaxy Book 12, let us highlight actual sales are underway at Big Red on April 21, though you still have to wonder if this thing is really worth $1,299.99. Apparently, both the “optional” keyboard and S Pen are “included”, with “PC-level” performance delivered by a seventh-gen Intel Core i5 processor, 4GB RAM and 128GB SSD.

Bizarrely enough, the Wi-Fi-only 12-inch Galaxy Book can be upgraded to 8 gigs of RAM and a 256 gig SSD if you so please, while the humbler 10.6-incher is offered in 64 and 128GB eMMC versions with 4GB memory, a Core m3 SoC and lower-res screen.

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About The Author
Adrian Diaconescu
Adrian has had an insatiable passion for writing since he was in school and found himself writing philosophical essays about the meaning of life and the differences between light and dark beer. Later, he realized this was pretty much his only marketable skill, so he first created a personal blog (in Romanian) and then discovered his true calling, which is writing about all things tech (in English).