Andy Rubin’s Essential Android smartphone gets benchmarked again, with… 18-inch (?!) screen

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There’s already an insane amount of buzz surrounding Andy Rubin’s Essential smartphone, given how little we know for sure about it. Technically, this is a device created by a super-small startup company, and the co-founder of Android Inc. hasn’t said when it’s supposed to fully break cover, let alone begin selling and shipping to end users.

We also found out only recently the bezel-slaying Essential will certainly run Android, although there was evidence of 7.0 Nougat-powered testing dating as far back as December. In addition to Geekbench, a handheld designated the Essential FIH-PM1 paid GFXBench a visit as well, confirming pre-installed Android 7.0 software, and revealing a number of key hardware specifications.

Unfortunately, at least one tidbit is obviously inaccurate, and another looks decidedly sketchy. We’re talking about an 18-inch (!!!) screen with an awkward 2560 x 1312 pixel resolution, and modest 16GB internal storage space (10 gigs user-accessible).

No reason to question the rest of the info, but it’s probably wise to take everything with a pinch of salt, from Snapdragon 835 processing power to 4GB RAM, a 12MP rear camera with 4K video recording capabilities, and 8MP UHD-capable selfie shooter.

Something tells us it’s still early days for pre-release Essential prototype testing, and even if FIH, aka Foxconn, is in charge of mass manufacturing, that could take a while with the rumored modularity and AI-revolutionizing dreams of Andy Rubin.

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About The Author
Adrian Diaconescu

Adrian has had an insatiable passion for writing since he was in school and found himself writing philosophical essays about the meaning of life and the differences between light and dark beer. Later, he realized this was pretty much his only marketable skill, so he first created a personal blog (in Romanian) and then discovered his true calling, which is writing about all things tech (in English).