The big four US carriers will let your exchange your Galaxy Note 7 for any phone… again

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Update: The Verge has confirmed that AT&T, T-Mobile and Verizon have followed suit with the same terms as Sprint’s exchange offer.

Even the utmost devotion to a long-beloved, long-respected brand has its limit, and if the CPSC concludes a “safe-to-use” new Galaxy Note 7 was indeed to blame for a recent US airplane fire, Samsung will certainly lose the trust of millions more of its customers for quite some time.

But if you’re already having second thoughts about the exchanged phone, and can’t possibly consider going through the torment of a second recall process, at least one major US carrier comes to the rescue.

“During the investigation window” for the latest highly-publicized Note 7 smoking incident, Sprint wants you to know it’ll expeditiously replace the phablet of any customer with “concerns regarding their device.” And no, you don’t have to wait for a third potentially faulty batch of the same gadget. Or necessarily go for a past Galaxy release.

The choice is all yours, including iPhones or Android models from Samsung’s rivals. Unfortunately, not the Pixel or Pixel XL, though you can probably also still ask for a refund, then take your money to the Google Store or Verizon.

Bottom line, while the Now Network “is working collaboratively with Samsung to better understand the most recent concerns regarding replacement Samsung Galaxy Note 7 smartphones”, you’re not obligated to wait for the investigation’s completion.

Source: Recode, The Verge

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About The Author
Adrian Diaconescu
Adrian has had an insatiable passion for writing since he was in school and found himself writing philosophical essays about the meaning of life and the differences between light and dark beer. Later, he realized this was pretty much his only marketable skill, so he first created a personal blog (in Romanian) and then discovered his true calling, which is writing about all things tech (in English).