iPhone 7 Plus teardown reveals bigger battery, more RAM, larger Taptic Engine

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It’s iPhone 7 launch day (for what it’s worth), and the repair specialists over at iFixit are apparently among the culprits for the plus-sized variant’s patchy worldwide availability in all colors.

But their rush to snap up the rose gold iPhone 7 Plus of course has noble motivations, the dual rear cam-sporting 5.5-incher being disassembled so you don’t have to do it at home, where you could damage some of its precious internals.

Like the 3, yes, 3GB LPDDR4 RAM supplied by none other than Apple’s arch-rival (and occasional ally) Samsung. Or the slightly souped-up 2,900mAh battery, which still doesn’t match the 2,915mAh capacity of the 6 Plus juicer from a couple of years back, though it realistically promises an hour longer running time compared to the 6s Plus.

Then there’s the usual convoluted circuitry and a bunch of chips and modules manufactured by companies as diverse as Qualcomm, Toshiba, Murata, Skyworks and Texas Instruments, which DIY enthusiasts will only be able to reach if they get past some decidedly intense adhesive, meant to help with waterproofing the device.

A number of other little tricks are employed to keep everything nice and protected, including bumpier cameras built into the chassis, and a rubber-wrapped SIM tray. That might also be one of the reasons the headphone jack is no more, alongside Apple’s “courageous” decision to enlarge the Taptic Engine and replace the old mechanical home button with one able to simulate a push courtesy of haptic feedback.

Source: iFixit

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About The Author
Adrian Diaconescu
Adrian has had an insatiable passion for writing since he was in school and found himself writing philosophical essays about the meaning of life and the differences between light and dark beer. Later, he realized this was pretty much his only marketable skill, so he first created a personal blog (in Romanian) and then discovered his true calling, which is writing about all things tech (in English).