Fenix’s return to Google Play reveals a much brighter future for Twitter apps

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Creating apps that give users powerful new ways to access Twitter has long presented an uncomfortable situation for developers: get too successful, and your app essentially shuts down. The problem’s been Twitter’s use of tokens that allow distinct users to connect with a third-party app, and so far there’s been a hard limit of 100,000 per title – hit that many, and you couldn’t sign on any new users. Earlier this week, popular Android Twitter app Fenix found itself running into that all-too-familiar fate, causing its developer to pull the app from the Play Store. Today Fenix returns, signaling a possible new era for Twitter’s relationship with apps.

Officially, Fenix dev Matteo Villa isn’t saying much beyond saying that he’s been in touch with Twitter, and the team has “helped to fix the issue.” Understandably, that’s been met with plenty of questions about exactly what happened behind the scnes – and if that means a possible extension to that 100K limit – but Villa reports that he’s unable to offer more details right now.

Whatever the solution was, it doesn’t sound like a temporary bandage, either, and Villa suggests that Fenix shouldn’t have any more user-limit problems with Twitter going forward.

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey made some comments last year about plans for the company to be more developer-friendly going forward, hinting that the 100K limit would be a lot more flexible in the right circumstances. Fenix’s return from the ashes may be evidence for precisely that new direction. We can’t say that every app will get the same special treatment, but there’s clearly room for Twitter to play ball here.

Source: Matteo Villa (Twitter), Droid Life

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck

Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen’s first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he’s convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he’s not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bits

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