Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 9.7 treated to Marshmallow makeover in Europe

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Now that practically all recent and semi-recent flagship Samsung phones can run the newest Android iteration in most parts of the world, including on major US carriers, it’s about time at least one of the company’s high-end tablets also left Lollipop behind.

Although we’ve received confirmation last month Marshmallow goodies are “in development” for the Galaxy Tab A, it’s actually the Tab S2 9.7 that’s making the leap today in an LTE-enabled SM-T815 configuration.

It of course makes perfect sense for the Super AMOLED-sporting big guy to jump on the M bandwagon first among Samsung gadgets measuring over 6 inches in screen diagonal, since the Tab A has nothing on the Exynos 5433 processor, 3GB RAM and ultra-high-res panel of the Galaxy Tab S2 9.7.

The advanced hardware and silky smooth refreshed software should help the one-year-old return in the spotlight, taking some of the sting away from its purported full-on sequel proving a modest rehash at best.

Unfortunately, we can only attest to the OTA update rolling out to the SM-T815 in Germany at the moment. On the bright side, unlocked LTE models are likely up for a spread across the old continent and eventually the world before long. Wi-Fi-limited variants may need to wait a few extra weeks, as will probably the Galaxy Tab S2 8.0.

But it’s all worth it, battery life enhancements, security improvements, granular app permissions, and Google Now on Tap alerts headlining the changelog of the massive 1GB+ bundle of joy.

Source: SamMobile

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About The Author
Adrian Diaconescu
Adrian has had an insatiable passion for writing since he was in school and found himself writing philosophical essays about the meaning of life and the differences between light and dark beer. Later, he realized this was pretty much his only marketable skill, so he first created a personal blog (in Romanian) and then discovered his true calling, which is writing about all things tech (in English).