Twenty-thousand-dollar smartphone promises crazy-advanced security-focused tech

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What sort of hardware do you think about when we mention a $20,000 smartphone? Ridiculous models with fancy designs and premium materials, but that are basically expensive facades on top of run-of-the-mill phones? Maybe that passes as a nice phone for someone who doesn’t know any better, but there’s generally been a big disconnect between luxury-positioned smartphones and those that are simply very, very good phones. Now one startup is attempting to bridge that gap, announcing plans to launch a just-under-$20,000 phone next month with some state-of-the-art capabilities.

We don’t know exactly what to expect from Sirin Labs AG’s first phone, but the company is clear that it will involve some next-gen tech. That includes things that are reportedly “two to three years in advance of the mass market,” but we’re not sure if that means some advanced software tools, or maybe some incredibly high-end hardware.

The goal, according to Sirin, is to release a phone with “almost military-grade security,” much in the the same vein as the Turing Phone. Of course, we all know how that model fared; will the Sirin phone be able to succeed? Good security is notoriously difficult to do well, especially when doing so in a user-friendly manner, and so far Sirin is an unproven entity. We won’t say it’s impossible, but we’re going to need a lot of convincing before we start believing that the company’s capable of pulling it off – even with a $20,000 phone.

Source: Reuters
Via: Phandroid

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!