Microsoft and Google reach a truce, agree not to go crying to regulators

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When you’re a company as big as Microsoft or Google, you’ve got a lot of eyes on you at any given time, ranging from media critics, to government watchdogs, to competing companies. And while that sort of exposure is a mostly inevitable consequence of being a tech giant, it sure can keep a good number of PR and legal employees busy round the clock. Any time that they don’t have to spend worrying about these issues is manpower that can be better allocated elsewhere, so to that end Google and Microsoft have found themselves coming to something of an agreement, each pledging to lay off the other and not go complaining to regulatory groups each time they think someone isn’t playing fairly.

Microsoft and Google each issued statements to that effect, promising to withdraw existing regulatory complaints against the other, and affirming that they’d rather compete by trying to release the best products and services, not by forcing legal action upon each other. If they do have beef, they’ll settle it between themselves, privately.

Of course, none of this is a guarantee that either will see their legal headaches magically disappear, as other entities are free to keep on complaining to regulators about the pair, but at least each will no longer have the other (and their sizable legal team) to worry about.

Can’t we all just get along?

Source: Re/code

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!