Google brings AMP’s fast-loading content to Google News

Advertisement

Last fall, Google revealed its grand scheme for getting the content we want to consumer on our phones to those handsets as quick as humanly possible, announcing Accelerated Mobile Pages. AMP represents a streamlined take on content distribution, reducing layout overhead in order to make accessing mobile web traffic as speedy as pulling up locally stored media. Back in February, Google took steps to further get the word out about AMP by highlighting pages featuring the tech in mobile search results, and now we’re leaning about a logical next step in its love affair with all things AMP, as the Google News & Weather app also begins putting AMP pages first and foremost.

Users will start seeing a rotating selection of AMP-enhanced articles featuring the day’s hottest stories, all optimized for fast loading. When you’ve only got a few moments to catch up on the news, waiting for content to load can really limit your ability to stay informed, so by utilizing AMP in this manner Google seeks to make its News app as useful as possible.

While Google’s shooting for essentially instant page-load times with AMP, even if you do have to wait a beat for a story to be pulled up, AMP content should still appear roughly four times faster than traditional news stories.

Google’s bringing AMP stories to Google News across the web, Android app, and iOS app, starting today – look for the AMP lightning bolt to recognize optimized content. English-language content will get the AMP treatment first, with other languages following soon.

Source: Google

Share This Post
Advertisement
What's your reaction?
Love It
0%
Like It
0%
Want It
0%
Had It
0%
Hated It
0%
About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!