Facebook experiments with streamlined posting tools, as user sharing dips

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How do you judge the success of a social network? The size of its user base? Sure. The amount of time users spend engaged with the service? Absolutely. But there’s another figure that helps drive that user engagement, and it’s an area where Facebook is reportedly seeing problems, with reports surfacing earlier this week that user-posted personal updates are on the decline. While reversing that trend threatens to be a complicated issue, Facebook may already be onto one way it can hope to get users posting more again, as the company tries out new ways to make it easier than ever to post.

Mark Zuckerberg shared a quick look at the Facebook app beta he’s running on his own iPhone, while starring in a video announcement for Facebook Live. There, he highlighted an always-accessible “Whats on your mind?” posting box, ready to expand into a variety of sharing options upon user interaction. Users running the Facebook beta are also seeing various iterations on the same theme on their own devices as the company rolls out different builds to its testers.

It may seem like a minor change, but with mobile driving Facebook access to the extent it is, even a small adjustment to posting procedures that encourages users to engage slightly more frequently with the service could have far-reaching repercussions on overall sharing metrics.

Facebook says that it’s redesigned its app in this manner “to inspire people and make sharing on Facebook more fun and dynamic.”

Source: The Verge

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!