Samsung Internet 4.0 with ad-blocking support can now be installed on Lollipop devices

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The world’s most popular Android device manufacturer might still not be in a position to threaten Google’s mobile OS domination with its in-house Tizen platform, but when it comes to smartphone web browsers, Samsung looks ready to give the search giant a healthy run for its money.

What could the aptly titled Samsung Internet app possibly do that Chrome can’t? For one thing, work in conjunction with third-party ad blockers to, well, block online commercials. Big G opposed this effort a while ago by pulling Adblock Fast from the Play Store, but quickly reversed course as public outrage sparked up.

Shortly thereafter, Samsung made its proprietary web navigator even better, though only for select members of the Galaxy family running Marshmallow. Now, the fourth version of Internet spreads its support wings to cover a large number of Android 5.0 and above handhelds, including the ancient Galaxy S4, S4 Active, Note 3, S5, S5 Active, plus the sub-flagship A7, A8, A5x, A7x, and A9x.

In addition to the ability of filtering spam and irksome advertising content, Samsung Internet 4.0 also brings Secret Mode to the table to thoroughly protect your privacy when surfing delicate corners of the World Wide Web (cough, porn sites, cough).

Other new and old features and strong suits of the Chrome-rivaling browser include seamless Gear VR integration for immersive 3D streaming, Secure Web Auto Login, Quick Access to favorite portals, Content Cards, Popup Video, Web Push, Reader Mode, and Knox support. Overall, it sounds like it’s worth a shot, whether online ads make your blood boil or not.

Source: Google Play

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About The Author
Adrian Diaconescu
Adrian has had an insatiable passion for writing since he was in school and found himself writing philosophical essays about the meaning of life and the differences between light and dark beer. Later, he realized this was pretty much his only marketable skill, so he first created a personal blog (in Romanian) and then discovered his true calling, which is writing about all things tech (in English).