It’s taken nearly four years, but the first Oculus Rift has shipped to a normal consumer

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They say the road to success is a long and intricate one, paved with setbacks and failure, and nobody knows that better than virtual reality pioneer Oculus.

The company originated in California way back in June 2012, and while the Rift head-mounted display’s path to consumer availability was never paved with failure per se, it took the VR goggles an excruciatingly long time to get ready for a proper rollout.

So long, in fact, that a number of contenders joined the immersive tech space and are now bidding for gold. But the HTC Vive is significantly costlier than the Oculus Rift, and the latter’s finally started shipping hours ago, with the first deliveries scheduled for Monday, March 28.

Happy, happy day for a handful of very early adopters, whereas folks looking to order the headset now can only hope to receive it in July, at best. Remember, it’s $600 a pop, sensor, remote, cables, Xbox One controller, and free copies of EVE: Valkyrie and Lucky’s Tale games included. Also, free access to premium VR pornographic content, thanks to Pornhub and BaDoinkVR.

The Oculus Rift still has to be paired to a compatible PC to function properly, and luckily, its manufacturer offers discounts on Asus, Dell, and Alienware desktops. Unfortunately, at the end of the day, you’ll pay a grand total of $1,500+ for the complete virtual reality experience, which might make Sony’s console-supporting solution feel far more tempting.

Source: Twitter
Via: The Verge

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About The Author
Adrian Diaconescu

Adrian has had an insatiable passion for writing since he was in school and found himself writing philosophical essays about the meaning of life and the differences between light and dark beer. Later, he realized this was pretty much his only marketable skill, so he first created a personal blog (in Romanian) and then discovered his true calling, which is writing about all things tech (in English).