Latest wave of Lenovo ‘structural’ changes sees Motorola President leave the building

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It’s been more than two years since Google unexpectedly announced it would sell Motorola Mobility to Lenovo, and almost a year and a half since the $2.9 billion transaction was actually completed. That sounds like plenty of time for the new conglomerate to gain an identity of its own and finish operating whatever changes management saw fit to make the business work.

The problem is Lenovo never looked focused and certain of the direction it intended to take the Moto brand in. At first, it seemed the two product families would stay separate, targeting different regions, some of which however overlapped.

It made sense then to move all smartphone manufacturing under the more experienced and respected division, but selling future-gen Moto Xs or Gs as X or G “by Lenovo” products just feels unnecessary. Not to mention it’s still unclear what will happen to Vibes or Lemons.

We do know for sure starting today who’ll be in charge of all these handhelds, at least. Not Rick Osterloh, the February 2014-appointed Motorola President and COO, but rather Gianfranco Lanci, Xudong Chen and Aymar de Lencquesaing.

Lanci sees his responsibilities greatly expanding, as he’ll lead the “realigned” Lenovo PC Group, now dubbed the PC & Smart Device Business Group, and comprising phablets in addition to PCs, detachables, tablets, gaming and smart home products running Windows, Chrome OS and Android.

Meanwhile, the remaining mobile devices, i.e. phones with a screen diagonal smaller than… 6 inches (?), will constitute Lenovo’s Mobile Business Group, co-presided by Chen and de Lencquesaing. The former is promoted from a senior VP position, and shall obviously focus on China to “help Lenovo become a leader in this major market.” As for the latter, he’ll manage not just North American operations, as before, but international markets altogether.

Rick Osterloh? Apparently, the decision to leave Motorola Mobility was his own, and Lenovo unenthusiastically “wishes him continued success in the future” while “appreciating his steady leadership” since the acquisition. We don’t want to speculate, but that sure sounds like a layoff to us.

Source: Lenovo Newsroom

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About The Author
Adrian Diaconescu
Adrian has had an insatiable passion for writing since he was in school and found himself writing philosophical essays about the meaning of life and the differences between light and dark beer. Later, he realized this was pretty much his only marketable skill, so he first created a personal blog (in Romanian) and then discovered his true calling, which is writing about all things tech (in English).