Samsung Galaxy S7 uses two different camera sensors, one homebrewed, one from Sony

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Apart from the obvious S7S7 Edge flat screen vs dual-curved panel contrast, and GPU performance discrepancies yielded by some variants packing Snapdragon 820 SoCs, while others carry Exynos 8890 silicon, it seems buyers of Samsung’s “next big things” have one more inequality to note.

Note, but probably not stress very much about, based on a similar technical difference between Galaxy S6 models that were supposed to be identical. We’re talking rear-facing camera sensors, with the wildly successful Korean OEM once again splitting the component’s manufacturing in two.

On one hand, there’s an in-house ISOCELL unit, part number S5K2L1, and on the other, you have an IMX260 developed by Sony. Now, we know what you’re thinking – Sony’s cams are the best. But that’s not always true.

In this particular case, there’s no reason to assume the shooters aren’t created equal, both of them delivering 12.3 megapixels, dual-pixel phase-detection autofocus, with each individual pixel measuring 1.4µm.

Indeed, these are both photography and video-recording powerhouses… on paper, and even though they can’t possibly be 100 percent alike, any resulting performance gap should be as hard to notice with the naked eye as last year.

That’s right, the Galaxy S6 used alternate Samsung and Sony cam sensors too, and the 2015 flagship only came in a processor configuration. Speaking of, it appears there’s no clear distinction between IMX260 and ISOCELL-sporting Galaxy S7 versions. In other words, you won’t be able to tell which camera you’re getting based on the SoC.

Sources: Reddit, SamMobile

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About The Author
Adrian Diaconescu
Adrian has had an insatiable passion for writing since he was in school and found himself writing philosophical essays about the meaning of life and the differences between light and dark beer. Later, he realized this was pretty much his only marketable skill, so he first created a personal blog (in Romanian) and then discovered his true calling, which is writing about all things tech (in English).