Android N dev preview doesn’t have a new Easter egg just yet – so no help with “N” name

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To the surprise of Android users everywhere, earlier today Google released the first developer preview for the upcoming Android N – over two months ahead of Google I/O. We’re still reeling to catch up with this turn of events (watch for our hands-on footage of the Android N dev preview arriving a little later), and while we’ll need to spend some time getting to know all the new features this preview delivers, there’s one big question we’d like to see answered as soon as possible: just what the heck is that N going to stand for? Unfortunately, that detail isn’t going to prove easy to come by, and one reliable tool for identifying Android’s new name isn’t yet available.

Today’s Android N preview may get your Nexus device running with Google’s latest pre-release code, but it’s lacking in at least one key area: there’s no no Easter egg.

Admittedly, that’s not a huge shock, as last year’s Android M dev preview similarly landed without its Easter egg ready for prime time – we got a big “M” icon after tapping on the version field in system settings but further taps only gave us a “¯\_(ツ)_/¯”. Ultimately, we found ourselves waiting for October to check out the new look for Google’s Marshmallow-ified Flappy Bird clone.

In his announcement post earlier today, Google’s Hiroshi Lockheimer may have teased that he was “nut tellin’” us anything about the N name yet (Nutella, anyone?), but elsewhere he’s clear that it’s still too early for Android N to even have a launch name. For the moment, all options are still in the running.

Source: Android Central, Hiroshi Lockheimer (Medium)

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!