Verizon’s Galaxy Note 5 is the first US carrier-specific Samsung to get Marshmallow

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Big Red is never early to anything. Likely due to the sheer size of its customer portfolio, Verizon can’t follow T-Mobile, AT&T and Sprint’s suit in shipping Galaxy S7s well in advance of the March 11 launch date.

At the same time, America’s largest wireless service provider is often the last of the “big four” to officially roll out Android software updates. Sometimes, third or even second. But extremely rarely, first.

Well, today is one of those scarce occurrences, as VZW foreshadows all three of its main rivals in sending over-the-air Marshmallow goodies to the Galaxy Note 5. Not only that, but we’re actually looking at the very first variant of a Samsung device to be upgraded stateside.

Quite an impressive feat on Verizon’s part, and a somewhat surprising development in an arguably chaotic Samsung updating program. Remember, the Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge preceded the Note 5 on the Android 6.0 bandwagon “globally”, but apparently, the US needs to wait a while longer.

Let’s be happy for the S Pen-enabled phablet’s owners on Big Red though, who have Google Now on Tap cards, Doze Mode battery life enhancements, flexible permissions, Wi-Fi Calling, Live Broadcast improvements, and new app icons and folder designs to cherish.

Don’t see the update yet? Manually check for it by diving into Settings, then About Device, and Software updates. Still nothing? No reason to panic, as it might take a few hours, one or two days tops, to spread nationwide.

Source: Verizon Support

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About The Author
Adrian Diaconescu
Adrian has had an insatiable passion for writing since he was in school and found himself writing philosophical essays about the meaning of life and the differences between light and dark beer. Later, he realized this was pretty much his only marketable skill, so he first created a personal blog (in Romanian) and then discovered his true calling, which is writing about all things tech (in English).