Tweet your way to a better iPhone experience with new Apple Support Twitter account

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Why do users choose Apple over competing mobile brands? High quality hardware? A polished software experience? Peer pressure? Sure, all solid reasons. But maybe one of the most compelling reasons to go with an Apple device, and one that’s especially attractive to novice users intimidated by other platforms, is Apple’s reputation for outstanding customer support. Bolstered by a nationwide fleet of brick-and-mortar stores that not only connect users with the latest Apple gear, but also give them a place to turn to for asking questions, attending classes, and seeking assistance with broken hardware, Apple’s user-support infrastructure is arguably second to none. Now Apple’s expanding its support offerings in a new direction online as the company launches an official Apple Support Twitter account.

The new account is designed to offer Apple users quick tips about getting the most out of their devices, while also acting as a point of contact for users interested in asking some more targeted questions.

While it’s only been active for a few hours now, the account looks to be off to a strong start, already tweeting some suggestions for how to best use the Notes app, and responding to a couple hundred user questions. Most of those quickly went in the DM direction, so it’s tough to say how many issues have ultimately been resolved, but if you’ve already had an early successful interaction with the Apple Support Twitter account, we’d love to hear about it: let us know how it went down in the comments.

Source: Apple Support (Twitter)
Via: The Verge

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!