AT&T and Sprint reportedly begin shipping Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge early as well

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You didn’t really think T-Mobile was the chosen carrier now, did you? Technically, Magenta scored a major publicity coup by being the first of America’s “big four” operators to deliver the highly anticipated Samsung Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge to early adopters.

But AT&T and Sprint are quickly following suit, themselves largely undercutting the March 11 deadline initially set on a global basis by the two phones’ manufacturers. Of course, we’re not talking about wide-scale launches… just yet, and we can’t even confirm a single unit having actually reached the doorstep of a single Ma Bell or Now Network customer.

The only thing we can report with relative certainty at the moment is several GS7 and S7 Edge buyers have seen their orders change status to “shipped” in the past 24 hours. That means a handful of very lucky Samsung fans should receive their precious new handhelds any moment now. Definitely, well in advance of March 11.

As always, Verizon is a little late to the party, probably because it’s scored the most pre-orders, looking to make amends with a pretty compelling Gear S2 bundle offer. Elsewhere, you’re “merely” eligible for a free Gear VR headset, typically priced at $100, and Sprint also lets you purchase a second device at half off.

AT&T charges $695 for the Galaxy S7 and $795 for the S7 Edge outright, allowing you to split the totals in monthly payments as well. With Next 24 plans, for instance, the flat 5.1-incher costs $23.17 every 30 days, whereas the dual-curved 5.5-incher sets you back $26.50 per month. All in all, it’s going to be mighty hard for LG to compete with this aggressive pricing and distribution prowess.

Source: Tech Times

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About The Author
Adrian Diaconescu
Adrian has had an insatiable passion for writing since he was in school and found himself writing philosophical essays about the meaning of life and the differences between light and dark beer. Later, he realized this was pretty much his only marketable skill, so he first created a personal blog (in Romanian) and then discovered his true calling, which is writing about all things tech (in English).