Google I/O 2016 registration window opens March 8, closes two days later

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The information software developers have been waiting for is finally here. While we’ve known ever since January the dates and venue of this year’s Google I/O conference, registration application deadlines and ticket admission prices are only now official.

There’s not much time left to raise $900, as the search giant will accept participation requests between 9AM PST on March 8 and 5PM PST on March 10. Obviously, attendance is limited, but signing up at the break of dawn next Tuesday won’t boost your chances of getting in.

That’s because Google shall randomly select attendees from the entire pool of candidates, no matter when they file their application. Meanwhile, we have great news to report for our student readers interested in the event, as a finite number of “academic” hopefuls will be chosen to take part in Android N’s announcement for the low, low fee of $300.

You’ll of course need to provide relevant documentation to score the discount, and otherwise, you’ll be prohibited from participating, as student tickets can’t be exchanged or upgraded to general admission licenses.

Google I/O 2016 tickets can’t be sold, bartered, auctioned, or transferred in any way either, and refunds will only be available if requested before April 29. Don’t forget to sign up for a Google account ahead of your application’s procedure commencement, and expect a couple of nice gifts in exchange for your 900 bucks. A Nexus 6P, hopefully, and perhaps a refined Cardboard version too.

Source: Google

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About The Author
Adrian Diaconescu
Adrian has had an insatiable passion for writing since he was in school and found himself writing philosophical essays about the meaning of life and the differences between light and dark beer. Later, he realized this was pretty much his only marketable skill, so he first created a personal blog (in Romanian) and then discovered his true calling, which is writing about all things tech (in English).