Apple releases iOS 9.3 beta 5 with promised return of full Apple Pencil input

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Going back to January, Apple’s iOS 9.3 beta release had been coming out like clockwork, with the company seeding a new beta to devs once every two weeks – most recently with iOS 9.3 beta 4 last Monday. With new Apple hardware expected to launch later this month, and a final version of iOS 9.3 likely to arrive along with the new devices, that doesn’t give Apple much time to finish up with its last-minute tweaks. Now it looks like that’s forcing Apple into an accelerated release schedule, and just eight days after the last beta arrived, today we see Apple follow that up with iOS 9.3 beta 5.

The big change here, at least based on what we’ve heard so far, is that Apple’s followed through on last week’s promise to repair the changes that had been made to the Apple Pencil’s input mechanics with the iPad Pro.

When it first arrived, the Pencil could largely be used as an extension of a user’s finger, navigating through the system UI and apps alike via swipe gestures. With iOS 9.3, though, Apple curtailed such stylus operation, limiting Pencil’s input to things like text fields and other app elements specifically designated for its use.

Apple responded to negative user feedback from those beta changes last week with a public assurance that it would restore the old style of Pencil control with the next iOS beta – and today it does just that.

In addition to the new iOS 9.3 beta 5 release, Apple’s also got new OS X 10.11.4 El Capitan beta 5, watchOS 2.2 beta 5, and tvOS 9.2 beta 5 releases also hitting developer hands today.

Source: 9to5 Mac

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!