Relax, everybody, there’s an easy way to bring back the app drawer on the LG G5

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How could you not love the LG G5? It’s entirely made of metal, not too small, not too large, as powerful as Android flagships get nowadays, it’s got phenomenal cameras on deck, great sound, a removable battery, microSD card slot and, best of all, it supports various “modules” for seamless audio or photography improvements.

Still, haters gonna hate, and Android forums, as well as comment sections dedicated to the phone’s announcement, were flooded with dissatisfied remarks on cell capacity, screen size and certain proprietary software tweaks mere hours after G5’s MWC debut.

But it turns out there was no reason to panic at the sight of no traditional app drawer, as the settings menu can put everything behind a shortcut again. All you need to do is switch from Home to EasyHome navigation, and poof, just like that, the home screen clutter will disappear.

You can obviously always revert back to the standard Home view if for some reason you’re bored of the app tray, which is the exact opposite of Samsung’s UI approach on the Galaxy S7. The “next big thing” does feature the app drawer off the bat, but there’s a similarly simple way to remove it and lay it all out in plain view.

Does this mean Android N could ditch the app drawer or tray, as tipsters have suggested, and some of you have quickly taken for granted? Hard to foresee, though we don’t think Google would ever enforce such a controversial change without allowing users to at least choose.

Sources: XDA-Developers, Ausdroid

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About The Author
Adrian Diaconescu
Adrian has had an insatiable passion for writing since he was in school and found himself writing philosophical essays about the meaning of life and the differences between light and dark beer. Later, he realized this was pretty much his only marketable skill, so he first created a personal blog (in Romanian) and then discovered his true calling, which is writing about all things tech (in English).