LG takes VR hardware in a new direction with wired 360 VR headset, 360 CAM capture solution

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When LG started talking about its G5 as a “modular” smartphone, we knew that we were about to meet a lot of new hardware. Beyond the phone’s snap-on modules, we’re also getting to know a couple of external accessories – and with virtual reality as hot as it is right now, it’s little surprise to see LG embracing it with the 360 CAM and 360 VR. Much as the G5 itself does things quite a bit differently than its predecessors, these accessories aren’t your garden variety camera and Cardboard viewer – let’s take a look at exactly what they’re doing to stand out from the pack.

Just as we heard, the 360 VR differs from most smartphone-based VR experiences as it doesn’t rely on a phone’s own screen. Instead, the 360 VR has its own display (with dedicated panels for each eye), and that move for integration lets LG keep the device’s weight way down. As a result, the 360 VR is lightweight enough to be worn like a pair of glasses – no bulky straps here – and even fold up for travel.lg-360-cam

Users will plug the 360 VR into the LG G5 to access 3D content – and yes, right now LG reports the the 360 VR will only function when paired with its new flagship phone.

Of course, a VR solution is only as good so far as you’ve got VR media to view – and to that end, LG is introducing its 360 CAM, a hand-held camera featuring a pair of opposing 13MP sensors, each with a wide-angle lens to capture their side of the action. LG’s prepped the device for use with both YouTube’s 360-degree video offerings, as well as Google StreetView. And of course, you can view your 360 CAM shots on the 360 VR – though a regular smartphone viewer will do in a pinch.

Source: LG

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!