Apple’s latest iOS 9.3 beta hits public availability

Advertisement

Apple’s getting into the home stretch of development for iOS 9.3, and a couple days back we saw the company release its latest beta build for the developer community. That’s well and good for them, but what about the rest of us? Well, a final 9.3 release is probably still a few weeks away, but with the arrival of iOS 9 last year, Apple created a public beta program for its users to take advantage of. Today, users enrolled in the program finally get their own shot at iOS 9.3 beta 3, as Apple expands availability to the publc.

Just like we told you earlier this week, one of the major changes in this new beta release is support for WiFi calling over Verizon. And while that may be the primary new feature, there are still a number of other smaller tweaks that help make this new release stand out from iOS 9.3 beta 2, including Control Center icon fixes, an improved lock toggle for Notes, and further UX development for the new Night Shift mode.

If you’ve yet to register for Apple’s public beta program, you can get set up through the link below, and even help contribute by providing Apple with valuable feedback. Not everyone’s comfortable trying out pre-release software, though, so you shouldn’t feel any pressure to sign up for the beta if you’d rather stick with fully tested iOS builds. Chances are, this one will be ready for Apple users everywhere sometime next month – and we wouldn’t be surprised to see it emerge right around the time of Apple’s rumored March 15 event.

Source: 9to5 Mac, Apple Beta Software Program

Advertisement

What's your reaction?
Love It
0%
Like It
0%
Want It
0%
Had It
0%
Hated It
0%
About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!