Huawei GX8 goes on sale stateside, but it’s probably not worth $350

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In its frenzied race to 120 million smartphone unit sales this year and consolidation of the number three spot on the global manufacturer ranks, Huawei doles out respectable mid-range Androids left and right, including in the US, a market that the OEM had trouble penetrating until not long ago.

But the company’s release strategy is a little too all over the place these days, especially if you add the Honor sub-brand to the equation. This literally just debuted on the North American continent, and already, it’s making life awfully difficult for one of its non-Honor cousins.

At first glance, the Huawei GX8 is a pretty robust sub-$400 offering, with an aircraft-grade aluminum construction in tow, super-fast fingerprint sensor, 4G LTE connectivity, 5.5-inch 1080p display, 2GB RAM, and Snapdragon 616 processing power.

Yet this bad boy costs $350 in horizon gold, mystic champagne or space grey, while the Honor 5X only sets you back $200 in dark grey, daybreak silver or sunset gold. The two phones are so hilariously similar that Amazon apparently rehashed Honor 5X’s promotional text for GX8’s product listing, live now, with limited stocks shipping.

Granted, the GX8 does seem to be slightly curvier around the edges, and it probably uses more metal for its premium build, but ultimately, you’re really paying $150 extra for Huawei’s logos and little else. There’s no difference in the software department either, with Android 5.1 Lollipop pre-loaded across the board, and both handhelds work on GSM carriers like AT&T and T-Mobile.

Sources: Amazon, Huawei

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About The Author
Adrian Diaconescu
Adrian has had an insatiable passion for writing since he was in school and found himself writing philosophical essays about the meaning of life and the differences between light and dark beer. Later, he realized this was pretty much his only marketable skill, so he first created a personal blog (in Romanian) and then discovered his true calling, which is writing about all things tech (in English).