VAIO takes a stab at Windows 10 Mobile hardware, and the Phone Biz sure looks pretty

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Of all the higher and lower-profile device manufacturers that have recently boarded the Windows Phone ship right before it seemingly sinks, perhaps the most surprising brand to do so is VAIO. No longer Sony’s property, the PC-focused Japanese company did anticipate this risky move by both launching an Android handheld and extravagant business-friendly Windows 10 tablet last year.

The VAIO Phone Biz, as the awkward name suggests, also targets enterprise consumers and business professionals, emphasizing a large part of its marketing efforts on Continuum support and how the device can seamlessly turn a bland monitor into a full-fledged desktop computer, capable of running the Office suite on a big screen.

Speaking of, the Phone Biz sports a respectable 5.5-inch Full HD panel, with an octa-core 1.5GHz Snapdragon 617 processor under the hood and 3GB RAM taking good care of your multitasking needs. We also know the cameras are 13 and 5 megapixels respectively, and the 16GB internal storage space can be expanded with an additional 64 gigs via a microSD card.

Meanwhile, things like battery capacity remain up in the air for now, as VAIO probably hopes prospective buyers will be so taken with the 5.5-incher’s exquisite looks, they’ll refrain from asking too many delicate questions.

Oh, yes, this is definitely a standout among your ho-hum plasticky Lumia 950 and 950 XL, boasting a fine silver-finished aluminum construction. But availability outside the Land of the Rising Sun feels unlikely, and even around those parts, the VAIO Phone Biz will only be sold unlocked, at 50,000 yen, or roughly $425. It sounds almost as doomed as the Windows 10 Mobile platform itself.

Sources: VAIO, Engadget, Gadgets 360

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About The Author
Adrian Diaconescu
Adrian has had an insatiable passion for writing since he was in school and found himself writing philosophical essays about the meaning of life and the differences between light and dark beer. Later, he realized this was pretty much his only marketable skill, so he first created a personal blog (in Romanian) and then discovered his true calling, which is writing about all things tech (in English).