India tops US for second place in smartphone market ranks, with 220 million users

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It was bound to happen sooner or later. After all, we’ve been hearing about the constant growth of smartphones in India since… forever, and the country is roughly four times as populous as the United States.

It’s therefore perhaps surprising it took so long to reach a billion mobile users in the region, 220 million of which are reportedly on Android, iOS or Windows Phone. With a 22 percent yearly hike in smartphone shipments, and a 15 percent boost in Q4 2015 alone, it doesn’t look like this market is in danger of saturation either, so the user base, the world’s second largest behind China, should continue to push towards 300 mil people in 2016.

Overall, there were no less than 100 million smartphones sold in India during the last calendar year, and the Make in India program managed to attract 20+ brands, which accounted for “almost half” of intelligent and dumb handhelds shipped between October and December.

Even with a handful of local manufacturers decidedly on the rise, “outsider” Samsung retained its crown for both the whole year and Q4, in both the smartphone and general handset divisions. Micromax followed in second, and Lenovo (including Motorola) jumped to third over the holiday season, but ultimately lost the 2015 bronze medal to Intex.

Lenovo did pick up a precious silver in the LTE battle, where it squeezed between Samsung and Micromax for the quarterly and yearly podium, while Microsoft slipped out of the top five “for the first time ever”, as feature phones near their inevitable extinction, and Lumias, well, pretty much the same.

Source: Counterpoint Research

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About The Author
Adrian Diaconescu
Adrian has had an insatiable passion for writing since he was in school and found himself writing philosophical essays about the meaning of life and the differences between light and dark beer. Later, he realized this was pretty much his only marketable skill, so he first created a personal blog (in Romanian) and then discovered his true calling, which is writing about all things tech (in English).