Samsung Gear 360 VR camera expected to launch alongside Galaxy S7

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All too often, when we’re looking at new forms of content on our phones, we find ourselves with a chicken-and-the-egg problem: maybe you’ve got a 4K camera on your phone, but chances are it doesn’t also have a 4K screen. We saw something like this back in the day for that hot minute when phones with autostereoscopic 3D displays were a thing, and now we’re facing a similar problem with the rise of VR viewers: sure, we can create limited still panoramas with our existing phones, but how do we create the kind of immerseive, 3D, all-around video that’s just asking to be viewed with the likes of Google Cardboard and Samsung’s Gear VR? Samsung may just have the answer in the form of some new hardware, as a leak outs the Gear 360 VR camera.

According to reports, the Gear 360 is a portable, self-powered spherical camera that utilizes a pair of 180-degree fish-eye lenses to capture video all around it. It will remotely connect to compatible phones, which so far have been listed to include only the Galaxy S7 (though hopefully we’ll be hearing about much broader handset support).

We haven’t heard anything about pricing just yet, but the way the hardware is described has it sounding like it’s definitely focused on the consumer market – and ideally with an affordable sticker price to match.

Samsung’s already brought similar tech to shows in the form of its Project Beyond 360-degree camera, but the Gear 360 looks like it will be a somewhat simpler version of that hardware.

Reportedly, Samsung’s interested in showcasing the Gear 360 at its Unpacked event on February 21, right alongside the Galaxy S7.

Source: SamMobile

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!