Google overhauls Android weather reports (just in time for big storm)

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If you’re anything like those among the Pocketnow crew who call the Northeast US their home, you’ve no doubt been checking the latest weather reports day-in and day-out over the last week or so as we get ready for a massive winter storm to hit. With heavy winds and substantial snow accumulation expected, these next few days are going to be some pretty dicey ones. While there’s not anything anyone can do to change the storm’s track, Google’s at least giving us a newly refreshed way to keep on top of the latest changes to the forecast, as the company rolls out some greatly enhanced weather-related features for its core Google app.

Now when you ask your Android phone about upcoming weather you’ll be presented with lots of new info about what to expect, from a detailed 10-day forecast, to finer-grained info on hourly conditions. If you’re looking to give your delicate skin a break, you’ll find UV index data, and you can better plan the start and end of your day with news on sunrise and sunset times.

Beyond all that hard data, Google is also offering a cute graphical representation of the weather, where you can watch a little frog go through his day as the on-screen conditions mirror those in the real world.

All this weather info isn’t just available for your current location, either, and you can add multiple cities to your report list, choosing between them from a convenient drop-down menu.

Be on the lookout for these new weather features to land with the latest update to the Google Android app, headed out now.

Source: Google

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!