Folding-screen smartphones could take just a little longer than predicted to get here

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We’ve been living in the era of curved-screen smartphones for years now, and while recent efforts like Samsung’s Edge models downplay their curved screens far more than earlier phones like LG’s G Flex and G Flex 2, the tech has still managed to stick around. We’ve been keeping our eye out for the inevitable next step for curved screens, as manufacturers move past statically curved displays and give us ones that are full-on bendable. But when could we hope to see such a handset launch? At one point rumors were looking to early-2016 availability, and a couple weeks back we heard the first such models would be a little further out, maybe sometime in H2. There’s still no official word, but now a new report from a market analyst suggests we’ll have an even longer wait – though one that just might be worth it.

Supposedly, manufacturers are working hard at decreasing curve radius, allowing screens to be bended more closely to flat – a key design concern when envisioning a handset that folds up to fit in your pocket. That new target could be screens that can tolerate a curve radius of just 3mm.

When would these nearly-flat-folding screens be ready? Don’t count on H2 2016, with these components reportedly not ready to go until sometime early next year. Unfortunately we don’t have anything more specific than that to go on, but if waiting a little longer means a much more impressive folding phone, we think we can live with a slightly longer wait.

Source: Kevin王的日记本 (Weibo)
Via: phoneArena

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!