Google drops Nexus 5X pricing; will the Nexus 6P follow?

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Smartphone sales come and go. Stay on top of things by following the latest alerts and keeping your eye out for a good deal, and you might just save a bundle on that new phone you’ve been lusting after – but all that deal-watching can be a lot of work. So while we absolutely love to bring you news of the hottest current deals, there’s something extra nice about being to tell you about a permanent price cut: no limited-time offer, no special restrictions to consider – just a new, lower price, from here on out. The Nexus 5X may be just over three months old at this point, but Google’s already taking an ax to its price tag, making the most affordable Nexus phone just a little bit more so.

When the Nexus 5X made its debut priced at just about $380, it was already a really nice deal; you got a lot of hardware for that money, to say nothing of the peace of mind from some of the fastest Android updates around. But from here on out, you can forget that $380 business, as Google’s dialing back the phone’s selling price to just $350.

Those savings extend to the Nexus 5X’s 32GB edition, as well, which drops from its previous $430 to a cool $400.

What we haven’t seen, though, is any similar motion over on the Nexus 6P side of the fence. Granted, the larger phone is a slightly more premium Nexus option, so it might stand to reason that Google wants to keep the price up to reflect the handset’s status. Then again, we’re about to see a flurry of early-2016 launches from the likes of Samsung and HTC, so maybe a little action by Google to keep its own flagship looking extra-attractive might be a smart move; we’ll keep our eyes peeled.

Source: Google

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!