Apple adamantly denies rumors of tool to help users leave iOS for Android

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Getting a new smartphone is one of the great joys of life (our lives, anyway), but moving all your stuff over to that new phone can pose a huge headache: pictures, apps, contacts, and all that jazz. It can be tricky enough between phones on the same platform (though that’s gotten much easier in recent years), but when you’re crossing OS lines, all bets are off. A few days back, a report emerged claiming that Apple was developing a tool to make it easier for iOS users to jump ship for Android, supposedly at the request of European carrier operators and regulators. Now Apple’s speaking up about the rumor, and says it’s working on nothing of the sort.

In a statement to BuzzFeed News, Apple spokesperson Trudy Muller asserts, “There is no truth to this rumor,” continuing, “We are entirely focused on switching users from Android to iPhone, and that is going great.”

Indeed, the company launched its own Android-to-iOS migration tool this past summer – along with Apple Music, one of the company’s first Android apps. And admittedly, a tool that makes it easier for users to leave your own service is a bit of a cognitive disconnect, but considering the pressure Apple’s already faced from the European Commission, it sounded like a plausible – if somewhat unusual – request.

Users on iOS can still move stuff like their contacts, photos, and calendar to new Android phones, but this often means a lot of manual steps, and occasionally relying on third-party apps.

Source: BuzzFeed
Via: The Verge

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!