China-based VR specialist 3Glasses brings 2K goggles to the US

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There’s a new kid on the virtual reality hardware block, and although its name probably doesn’t ring any bells stateside, it’s currently flaunting “over 10 years of experience in the industry and over 200 successful projects” at the 2016 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.

3Glasses claims its D2 Vanguard Edition head-mounted display is “lighter, quicker and more durable than the industry’s leading VR headsets” (cough, Oculus Rift, cough), and we have to admit on paper this thing looks compact, sleek and yet surprisingly robust.

It tips the scales at 246 grams, features 64-bit Windows 7 and 8 compatibility (no Win 10 support, oddly), and trumps both the finished Rift and HTC Vive Pre in terms of screen resolution, at 2,560 x 1,440 pixels, aka 2K or Quad HD, compared to 1,080 x 1,200 per eye, and 2,160 x 1,200 in total.

Of course, a panel’s superior ppi doesn’t always make it sharper, and we’ll need to verify the sub-13ms latency and 110° field of view claims before concluding the 3Glasses D2 Vanguard Edition is indeed better than its Western-hyped rivals.

What we definitely like about these swanky new Chinese VR goggles is they have an official price tag attached to their convoluted name already ($400), and they’re reportedly headed for US stores in “early 2016.” 3Glasses even has its full-year plans all mapped out, with the “revolutionary” Blubur S1 next in line for a North American dispatch with an added hand gesture-tracking depth camera in the mix, and an all-in-one, standalone, computer-free VR device dubbed Blubur W1 also slated for a commercial debut in the coming months.

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About The Author
Adrian Diaconescu
Adrian has had an insatiable passion for writing since he was in school and found himself writing philosophical essays about the meaning of life and the differences between light and dark beer. Later, he realized this was pretty much his only marketable skill, so he first created a personal blog (in Romanian) and then discovered his true calling, which is writing about all things tech (in English).