Lenovo Vibe S1 Lite targets selfie addicts on tight budgets

Advertisement

The world’s most successful PC manufacturer doesn’t look ready to throw in the towel as far as in-house smartphone production is concerned either, despite ongoing reorganization efforts, an increased focus on Motorola-branded gadgets, and rampant rumors of imminent Vibe extinction.

Forget all that, as the Vibe family grows by one today, after the somewhat low-profile CES 2016 introduction of the S1 Lite in jam-packed Las Vegas. Oddly enough, we’re hearing the $200 Android mid-ranger will only go on sale “early this year” in countries “where Lenovo smartphones are sold”, i.e. not the US, which remains Moto’s main turf.

In a way, that’s understandable, since the Lenovo Vibe S1 Lite would directly compete against the third-generation Moto G, with a superior 5-inch Full HD IPS display on deck, slightly larger 2,700 mAh battery beneath the hood, and greater emphasis on photography skills.

As the name suggests, a number of downgrades compared to the non-Lite Vibe S1 unveiled last fall are part of the deal, though you’re probably not going to miss the gimmicky front-facing dual camera. Mostly because the new guy should produce exquisite self-portraits too, courtesy of a single 8MP secondary snapper with a 5-piece lens for “zero-distortion”, Sony image sensor, and built-in “selfie flash.”

The primary, rear-facing cam is obviously even better, boasting a 13 megapixel sensor and dual LED flash, while everything else looks decent but short of mind-blowing on paper: 2GB RAM, 16GB expandable storage, Android 5.1 Lollipop pre-loaded, 4G LTE connectivity, dual SIM support.

All in all, the bang for your buck is satisfying, unless you’re not that into selfies and live in a country the K4 Note could also be an option.

Source: Phonearena

Advertisement

What's your reaction?
Love It
0%
Like It
0%
Want It
0%
Had It
0%
Hated It
0%
About The Author
Adrian Diaconescu
Adrian has had an insatiable passion for writing since he was in school and found himself writing philosophical essays about the meaning of life and the differences between light and dark beer. Later, he realized this was pretty much his only marketable skill, so he first created a personal blog (in Romanian) and then discovered his true calling, which is writing about all things tech (in English).