LG Tone Infinim Bluetooth headset gets ready to show off its new hardware at CES 2016

Advertisement

Despite its unusual design, with neck-hanging band and retractable earbuds, we unintentionally found ourselves learning to love LG’s old Tone Ultra Bluetooth headset. It may not have been the accessory we expected, but dammit – it was pretty solid at doing its job. In the time since that model debuted, we’ve seen it followed up by more premium models like the Tone Infinim, and now in the days leading up to CES 2016, LG’s getting a head start on its new product launches as it reveals a next-gen Tone Infinim design.

The new Tone Infinim doesn’t attempt to verge too far away from what worked for its predecessors, and keeps the same around-the-neck, retracting-earbud layout while tweaking its appearance for a more modern look. Primarily, though, LG has focused on bringing the wearable some new features and upgraded components, like its “Quad-Layer Speaker Technology” promising better tonal balance and improved frequency response, as well as the introduction of a pair of noise-canceling microphones.

Improvements manifest on the software side, too, and the Tone Infinim’s companion app picks up both a voice memo feature and one that lets you use the headset to help you track down a misplaced smartphone.

Sales are set to begin in February, starting with the US before spreading to markets abroad. We’re looking forward to checking out the LG Tone Infinim and all the accessories CES 2016 has to offer – check in next week for Pocketnow’s complete coverage.

lg-tone-Infinim-2

Source: LG

Advertisement

What's your reaction?
Love It
0%
Like It
0%
Want It
0%
Had It
0%
Hated It
0%
About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!