Facebook will soon load News Feeds on the slowest connections, enable offline comments

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Messenger-based digital assistance, a slew of “Reactions” to enrich the classic like-and-share user experience, added support for new Apple devices and technologies, searchable public posts, 360-degree video on iOS, security enhancements for Androids.

It’s all part of Mark Zuckerberg’s vision to retain the first billion Facebook daily active users, sign on even more people to the world’s most popular social network, and ultimately, take over the Internet. Cue maniacal laugh?

No need, because FB also continues to improve as far as emerging mobile markets and generally unstable network connections go. While offline likes and shares have been possible for quite some time now, the ability to pen a story comment when on a cyberspace break will only be supported after proper testing in the near future.

Of course, you won’t get to actually post the comment until re-connecting to the internet, but at least you can keep busy on a Wi-Fi-lacking plane, on the tube, or wherever it might be tricky to smoothly surf the web.

Even better, you should no longer worry about having nothing to read offline, as your News Feed will soon load (pretty much) normally at all times. What Facebook aims is to pull stories of interest on your phone when connected, and then save them for rainy days.

Sounds simple, straightforward yet extremely convenient for folks in 2G-reliant countries. Obviously, News Feeds will be refreshed every time FB sees a network speed spike, so as long as you don’t stay off the internet for hours on end, you’ll always be able to access relevant content.

Source: Facebook Newsroom

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About The Author
Adrian Diaconescu

Adrian has had an insatiable passion for writing since he was in school and found himself writing philosophical essays about the meaning of life and the differences between light and dark beer. Later, he realized this was pretty much his only marketable skill, so he first created a personal blog (in Romanian) and then discovered his true calling, which is writing about all things tech (in English).