HTC HD2 now runs Android Marshmallow; why would you ever need another phone?

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It’s often said that in this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes. Smartphone fans who have been paying attention to developments over the past six years can add another item to that list: that no matter what new mobile operating system comes out, the HTC HD2 will run it. From its early Windows Mobile 6.5 days, we’ve seen enthusiasts port pretty much every viable OS under the sun to the handset, from later Windows Phone editions, to Android, and even Firefox OS. The plucky little handset isn’t about to stop now, and there’s already been some success in bringing Android 6.0 Marshmallow to the phone.

As is often the case when we’re talking about early ports of the latest platforms to the HD2, there’s a lot of stuff that’s glitchy and broken, but even those limitations do little to detract from the impressive feat of running a 2015 OS on a 2009 smartphone.

If you have an HD2 lying around and are curious to take this release for a spin yourself, keep in mind that cellular communication, Bluetooth, USB connectivity, and camera operations aren’t exactly working right. The release is build on CyanogenMod 13, with a ton of tweaks to get it playing as nicely as it is with the HD2.

Will the HD2 run Android 7.0 when that release finally arrives? We can’t make any promises, but you had better believe that an impressively dedicated community will be doing its darnedest to make that happen, too.

Source: macs18max (XDA-Developers forums)
Via: XDA-Developers

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bits Read more about Stephen Schenck!